Shopping for a snow blower, maybe.....

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wrote:

Good GAWD- a British clone of a 1950 Gravely!!!! Talk about setting technology back 60 years.
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Per snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca:

A track-drive Honda was calling out to me a few years back.
But then I started wondering about transport issues. i.e. If I want to clear paths in a park that is a quarter-mile from my driveway, how am I going to get the machine to the park? Right now, I just put my walk-behind garden tractor with snow thrower into high gear and walk...
--
Pete Cresswell

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On Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 12:49:36 PM UTC-5, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

What makes you think a track type won't go just as fast? An Abrams tank will do 50mph, won't it? I'd be more worried about longevity of the treads. Tires are cheap, I'll bet the treads aren't
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Per snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca:

Italian.... but you've got the idea.
British implementation of rust proofing: "Oil Seals".
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Pete Cresswell

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The tread on my 9HP self propelled are so aggressive that I'm not sure a track drive would be all that more effective. I certainly haven't had any issues going up and down a 250' mountain side driveway. The previous owner put chains on, but those don't do a whole lot as they are almost swallowed between the tread..
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On Tue, 13 Jan 2015 11:14:24 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My memory is getting bad. I wonder if it's the hyperparathyroidism I just learned about.
I had a '50 Olds with a 300 ci engine. a '65 Pontiac with a 318 a '67 Pontiac with, I guess you're right, a 400. and a '72 or 73 Buick with a 455.
After that, I had LeBarons with toy engines. They didn't even melt the snow off the hood.
I thought I had a 389 in there somewhere, but I guess not.
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wrote:

I'd tie a toboggan behind my Yamaha and ride. Not terribly fast, but easier than walking!!
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wrote:

Close - it was a 303 Rocket

More likely a '65 Plymouth with a 318. 65 Pontiacs were 389 or 215 unliss they were Canadian,with 230,283 or 327 Chevvies

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wrote:

I drove a 65 Canadian Parisienne convertible for a short time. 283 Powerglide. It was originally white with red interior and black top, when the boss got it, it had been painted an ugly green. We painted it Cherry red and it looked great and sold before we got it re-assembled (It had sat on the lot for almost 3 years when green until I drove it and told the boss to paint it.)
I also owned a 1985 LeBaron Mark Cross Town and Country wagon with the Mitt so shitty 2.6 Hemi in it untill the body pretty well fell off of it.
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wrote:

I spent 2 winters in Central Africa, Before that I really ENJOYED winters. Snowmobiling, cross country ski-ing,and all kinds of other cold-fun stuff. When I came back I didn't enjoy the cold so much. Then about 30 years ago I mashed up a couple of fingers - and now they hurt like the dickens when they get cold - but I still wouldn't trade Central Ontario weather for Southern US weather year round.Several friends and a niece spent several years in Florida and after 2 major hurricaines, moved back north. A couple other friends spent some time in the south - and after several near misses (missed by less than a block) with Tornadoes, headed back north too. They go to Texas for part of the winter.
You really can't beat our spring and fall weather, the summers are hot enough for me that I wouldn't want to be much further south, and about half the winter is actually pretty nice.
Colder than blazes the last week or so, but yesterday and today the sun is out and not too much wind so even -24C is quite tolerable
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Per snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca:

When I had been living in Hawaii for about 7 years, I was sitting in this tourist trap in Waikiki called "The International Marketplace".
It was December and the temps were way down - like low seventies/high sixties.... I had a long-sleeve cardigan on and was freezing my pasty white butt off.
To cut to the chase, a tourist from someplace like Broken Pelvis, Montana sat down on the same bench I was sitting on.
I guess he thought he had to say something, so his opening statement was "Sure is hot and muggy here...."
--
Pete Cresswell

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(PeteCresswell) wrote:

Hi, Of course!!!, LOL!
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On Wed, 14 Jan 2015 12:44:00 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

A simplicity is also a good machine. and +10 on buying from a reputable dealer.
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Per snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com:

How about "Pleasure is partially defined by pain" ?
i.e. Q: "Why are you banging your head against the wall?"
A: "Because it feels so good when I stop."
--
Pete Cresswell

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wrote:

If you're only working on a 50ft driveway, I'd recommend an electric one. No screwing around with bad gas after it sits in the summer, no hard starting when you're real cold, no running out of gas, and not being able to drive to get some until the roads are plowed, and all the other problems with gas units. All you need is a 50ft. cord (made for cold weather), and the blower....
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snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com:
Simple solution to bad gas off season: Never completely fill the tank of the mower or blower.
Better to make frequent stops for refills than leave gas in the tank for more than one month at a stretch.
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On Saturday, January 10, 2015 at 8:31:43 AM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

A couple thoughts on this: better quality machines have carb bowls with a drain; also, additives change seasonally and may not start well in Winter.
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Per Norminn:

One thing I would look for is working shear pins on the impeller.
I have a snow blower add-on for my BCS standup tractor and found that the factory had pounded in steel sleeves where shear pins should have been.
You hit a newspaper or something in that condition and I would think it could break a crankshaft.
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Pete Cresswell

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On Friday, January 9, 2015 at 7:20:26 AM UTC-5, NorMinn wrote:

I have 2 snowbowers which I finally quit using..........
Snowlowers toss rocks way better than longer than snow:(
So will the toss area have anything that can be damaged? Errant rocks show up any time:(
since your older like me, at least check into a 4 wheel quad with a snow blade, pushing even a power driven snowblower is hard work
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On Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 2:52:52 PM UTC-5, bob haller wrote:

I guess that depends on where you live, how much snow you typically get and the size of the area. Here in NJ, I wouldn't say using a power driven snowblower is hard work for 90% of the snowfalls. On the few occasions when we get a lot, like 16"+, then it becomes more difficult. The area at the end of the driveway where the township plow throws extra snow is the main trouble area. My driveway has a little grade at that point and between that and the extra, heavy snow, it can take some pushing and shoving to get the blower to do what you want it to do. But usually after you have one pass through, opened up, it gets easier. You can take 1/2 cuts if needed, etc. If Norminn doesn't have experience with one, maybe she can try out a neighbor's before buying.
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