Shingles without felt?

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Michael Nickolas wrote:

My shingles are asphalt. The section that's the most shaded is in the worst shape, which make me think staying damp damages asphalt shingles. Perhaps it damages cedar more.
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Yeah, they really want the wood to be able to dry out. I'm replacing some old plastic siding someone put on my house's Mansard roof before we bought it. Using cedar shakes. It's slow going, just the two of us, but we're getting there. Here is a pic:
http://home.comcast.net/~newspost/P1010011.JPG
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Michael Nickolas wrote:

A mansard roof looks like a hassle for construction and maintenance. I read up on it. Mansard lived in the 16th Century, but the style is older. It became popular in the 19th Century. Houses and other buildings were getting taller, but tall walls were esthetically unappealing. Nowadays a fake mansard is used to hide machinery on a flat roof.
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Well, the hardest part about our re-roofing job is the fact that the Mansard has a curve in it. In order to get the shakes to make the curve we first tried doing short courses but that seemed like a waste of material so we instead soak full length shakes in water over night. Wet, they bend nicely to the curve.
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