Shaving Door by small amount

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I have a bedroom wooden door that grabs the carpet just enough that I want to shave the bottom of the door by an eighth of an inch to prevent the door from grabbing. Can someone tell me the best way to do it?
Thanks,
JD
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use a sander
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minder wrote:

I don't have one.
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Well I should ask what tools do you have. I won't. I will just list your choices. Pick the one you have.
Sander. Hand or power plane. Rasp. A sharp knife but it will look like crap. If you are still reading go buy one of the above or some sandpaper and do it the hard way.
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minder wrote:

I don't have one. Is there any other way to do it? I do have a circular saw that I have not used much.
JD
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snipped-for-privacy@spamgourmet.com wrote:

Yes. A standard, hand-held circular saw is the right thing. Get a pair of C-clamps and set a fence the will guide the saw across the bottom. Agreed, it's a pain to take the door down and find a table or saw horses to support it while cutting but that is the biggest part of the problem. The actual cutting will be 30 seconds.
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I'm assuming Iyou don't have a hand plane either. If you haven't used the circular saw very much you may want to practice before trying this on the door.
Take the door off, lay it flat on saw horses or propped up off the floor on a couple pieces of 2X4. Take your circular saw, unplugged at this point, with the blade set for maximum depth, and with the guard pulled back, push the blade up against the edge of the door to be trimmed so that the side of blade is flat against that edge. Now mark a line on the door against the edge of the saw shoe that is laying on the door. Set the saw aside. Clamp a straight edge of some kind, a straight board would be fine, to the door, parallel to the edge to be trimmed, and 1/8" (or whatever the amount you want to trim the door by) further away than the mark you made, less any amount needed for sanding, planing, etc. to finish the saw cut.
Set your circ saw cut depth as necessary, plug it in, and hold it tight to the straight edge guide board to trim the door edge. If you have a good quality saw and blade, you may not need to sand or plane the edge. You don't need to buy a sander to do one door, just wrap some sandpaper around a block of wood, and rub the edge if necessary to smooth it. Depending on how rough the saw cut edge is, probably 80 grit would be adequate.
--
Make it as simple as possible, but no simpler.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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I've done this by taking down the door and laying it on some saw horses (or have two friends get down on all fours) . Clamp a straight edge across the bottom of the door at the proper height (depends on the saw) then buzzing off the bottom with a jigsaw or circular saw, either works well with a good blade.

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Leo wrote:

I agree with leo. taking an eighth of with a sander is going to take a LONG time anyway. use a straight edge for a saw guide,and dress the cut up with a bit of hand sanding. use caution if it's a veneer door, as the veneer can chip off. in that case, pre score the door where to are going to cut it with a sharp utility knife (only need to do the side that you are cutting from--the underside won't chip).
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A belt sander with coarse grit takes it down pretty good.

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Yep a circular saw is best and a clamped straight edge is essential. Might want to put masking tape on all surfaces to be cut and push it on very tightly. That will reduce or eliminate potential tear out.
Leo wrote:

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George E. Cawthon wrote:

I'd also suggest spending not-a-lot for a fine-toothed blade for this one-time use.
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snipped-for-privacy@spamgourmet.com wrote:

Since the circular saw doesn't get used much, I'm a bit worried you'll end up with a fubar door if you go that route. I recommend the hand plane - less than $10 everywhere for a small one and you'll shave an 1/8" pretty quickly. You'll have much more control, and thereby have much less chance of an "Oh crap!" moment.
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Squirrel wrote:

if you are going to suggest he get a plane, you are also going to have to give advice on how to set it up, plane endgrain without tearing it, sharpen it, etc. there are plenty of ways to screw up with a plane too, especially when a whole 1/8 has to come off.
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Thanks to everyone for their very useful tips. Not sure whether I want to do this or just hire a handyman to do the work.
JD marson wrote:

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marson wrote:

Set up to some of us means lapping the plane sole dead flat through progressively finer grits up to 400, then honing and stropping the iron (the blade) until you can shave with it. If the iron has a breaker cap, that too must be honed so that it mates perfectly with the iron so that shavings won't jam underneath.
For one door, use the circular saw with a fence. To prevent splintering, you can score the cut line with a utility knife OR tape it OR run the saw twice, the first time very shallow, about 1/32", OR clamp a sacrificial 1/2" plywood strip over top and cut the door and the plywood at the same time.
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A hand held circular saw would be the first choice. Make sure to use a straight edge and sharp knife to score through the face veneer of the door and cut slightly below the score line to prevent pulling long splinters in the veneer. A quick rub with a piece of sandpaper on a wood block to get rid of the sharp edges and a quick coat of varnish/paint/lacquer to seal the bottom of the door. Rehang.___________________________ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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snipped-for-privacy@spamgourmet.com wrote:

Any good carpenter would use a router to cut it off, but my advice is for you to take door down carry it tio a cabinet shop and have them do the job. They will use a router. if they are woodworkers of reliabilty Jack
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Jack, I have been a commercial, AGC rated master carpenter for over 40 years. I have never, and I have never seen a door bottom cut with a router. I have seen them cut by many other methods. A router would be absolutely the last tool I would have gotten out to do the job. Do you still need to score the veneer to prevent splintering with a router bit? When I have cut borrowed lite and grille holes with a router and template, I have always scored the veneer on the cross grain cuts, what have you found?
___________________________ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG
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On 7 Dec 2006 18:47:08 -0800, " snipped-for-privacy@spamgourmet.com"

tape sandpaper to the rug.
Dismount the door, and take a handplane, sander, or tablesaw to the bottom edge, depending on what tools you own.
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