Sewer pipe failing - suggestions?

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On Tue, 24 Apr 2012 13:34:14 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

I'd go with whichever is cheaper unless he is seriously thinking of staying a long time. I don't think the PVC will crack that fast so my thought is go with the cheaper way for most of the run. Where it goes under the tree or under the house may need something else. The idea is just to try to keep the cost down and not build something to last another 90 years again.
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The man who installed my sewer pipe last year poured sand around it before backfilling the trench, so there are no rocks pressing against it. The ~1970 PVC pipes just bent when he dug them up.
jsw
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On Wed, 25 Apr 2012 08:00:02 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

The construction drawings I've seen in the past said to backfill with sand so I believe your installer did the correct way. I know that's what I would want in my backfill around the pipe.
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rangerssuck wrote:

Just because that seems to have happened to your neighbor doesn't mean it's going to happen to you any time soon.

When you get to the point of having a downstairs toilet or sink needing a long time to drain, that's when you'd need to look into the issue.
You seem to want to go looking for problems or issues before you even know you have a problem or issue.

The clean-out access cover on the tie-in into the drain line. This will be in the basement where the main drain stack goes through the basement floor.
Alternatively, you (or the plumber) can temporarily remove any or all toilets in the house and run a snake through the open drain-line for as far as it will go.
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He could also get to the point of having the failing pipe just clog suddenly. Plenty of sewers clog with the first notice being complete and sudden blockage. And if that happens in the middle of winter, with the ground frozen, he's going to be in worse shape, with less time to explore options and get a good price.

He has a decaying 90 year old pipe that has been inspected by camera and is down to 2" in spots. That IS a problem.
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" snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net" wrote:

Snaking a pipe to clear it is no problem in winter. The pipes are buried well under ground - below the frost line. If freezing was an issue, then everyone would have frozen sewer pipes in the winter.

No it's not.
I'm sure he's got better ways to spend $1k / $5k / $10k on his house.
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If my pipe to the street, or something else downstream, clogs and the backflow preventer closes off the pipe, and I flush an upstairs toilet, where is that water going to go?
Where would it go if the pipe was clogged without a backflow preventer?
jsw
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LOL that's what I was thinking too. The backflow preventer is there to protect against waste water flowing into the house from the sewer system. That can happen when there is some unusual problem, ie the municipal sewer gets flooded with rainwater, clogged, etc. Then with no backflow preventer you could have your basement fill up with sewage through floor drains, laundry sinks, or even worse, it might come out the first floor drains....
If the pipe gets clogged, then flushing a toilet with or without the backflow preventer should produce the same result.
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Well, that's exactly my point. The backflow preventer isn't going to stop my own sewer water from ending up in my basement. It only prevents the rest of the world's crap from landing here.
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Not really. A check valve will prevent outside sewage coming into the house; it will do nothing if/when the sewer clogs, and you continue to generate sewage within said house that has no exit.
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On Wed, 25 Apr 2012 05:16:40 +0000 (UTC), David Lesher

Damned hard to get Ma to do the dishes out the back there and, I might add, the first one out on a frosty winter morning breaks the ice, so to speak.
It does encourage courtesy in the family though. "No, I can wait. you can go first". -- Cheers,
John B.
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David Lesher wrote:

So you agree with me on that point.

I did not say that a backflow-preventer does anything when/if the sewer clogs.
Read more carefully next time.
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I haven't seen anyone mention it, but so the plumber doesn't need to dig outside? Then when he is done YOU will need to dig outside, so that you can waterproof the exterior of your basement again where he jack hammered it. jk
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I suspect that 90 year old piping will need to be replaced. The question is when. Do you do it at your convenience or do you wait until the dead of winter when there is snow on the ground to do it? My luck would be that it would completely fail on Dec 23rd when a big family get together is underway. BTW, around here, south Louisiana, it costs $150 to get the camera. Just went through that. I wonder if you can dig the yard up until you get close to the tree, then slip a 3" pipe inside the 4" to extend to the city main and then replace everything back to the house. Murphy taught me many years ago that anything will happen at the worst possible time so I try to at least get the jump on Murphy when I can. BTW, three estimates makes sense before you agree to do anything serious. I have no doubt that the plumber you called is more than willing to raise his prices because he thinks he has you over a barrel.
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The jackhammering is not on an outside wall. Th pipe is buried in concrete inside the basement.
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I feel for you.
The best I can say is that the general rule for things like that is to get three estimates. That usually gives you enough information to know if someone is way too low and likely to do a bad job. And enough information to know if someone is way too high for what is involved.
You might also check Angie's list too.
Tell your wife that you want to get three estimates and that it is unlikely to fail in the next couple of weeks while you figure out the best thing to do.
Dan
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You might want to get an estimate from someone who is outside of your local area if you decide to line the sewer pipe. Maybe contact the Perma-liner company in Colorado for recommendations of someone else to contact. And maybe do an internet search for other companies that sell systems to reline pipes. Dan
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Thanks, Dan. That's good advice. Also, the plumber who did the camera work and gave the $7700 quote was from Angie's list. The $40 camera work was an Angie's list "big deal."
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On Tue, 24 Apr 2012 07:16:00 -0700 (PDT), rangerssuck

A side note to keep in mind: I had what I thought was a flow problem (88 year old house, CI drain and sewer pipes) so I called the town first (Metuchen). If your town is anything like mine, they'll come out and run one of those cameras downstream of your house to check the street sewer line before you spend money having your own sewer line worked on. They did it for free.
It doesn't sound like an issue in your case but it was reassuring to have them check that out. Then I had the sewer line reamed out, and I have no flow problems. It may just have been some backing up in the line at the street, after Hurricane Irene. People were draining their basements for a couple of weeks after that.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Tue, 24 Apr 2012 10:35:02 -0400, Ed Huntress

I can't imagine the smell while draining the basement. Just curious, where did they drain it to? Storm sewers?
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