Septic pipe work

As a follow up the question I just posted about clogged drains, is it a reasonable DIY job to alter the drain angle on your septic system pipe into the tank? The main line that leads to the tank is at a very shallow angle - something in the realm of 5 degrees - it's a barely perceptable angle - yet the line only has to run 15 feet at the most AND the pipes leading to it are about 12 inches long. I'm thinking I'll get better drain performance if I raise the beginning of the septic line up about 6 inches, shorten the drop down lines, re-running the tank line at a higher angle. There are literally only 4 incoming lines - 3 at the start for the bathroom (toilet, sink, tub) and one coming in at the kitchen almost at the tank.
Somehow I don't think this is something a DIY should do and quite possibly I'm over-engineering this. I'd fully expect to have to do the work while wearing a chemical/biological warfare suit and see a shrink afterwards to reduce the damage seeing the interior of the tank caused my psyche. (Note: I have actually seen the inside of it, I witnessed it being pumped out when the house was sold - but I didn't actually put my HEAD into it like I would if I had to re-do the pipes.)
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Too steep of an angle will allow the liquid to run off, stranding the solids in the pipe. The shallow angle helps float the solids to the tank. A slope of " per foot should be sufficient.
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I hadn't thought of that, one of the reasons why I asked I guess. Sounds like something I should just leave the heck alone.
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Right. A Cardinal Rule of Repairs: If it aint broke, dont fix it!!
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