Securing 2x6 To Cinder Block?

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Kayak storage on the beach.
Kind of like this: https://picasaweb.google.com/108149798664924808733/AI#6188481736115293042 except replacing the two pavers under each 2x6 with a cinder block.
I would like to secure the 2x6's to the cinder blocks so the boards don't squirm around when loading/positioning the kayak.
I am thinking two blue masonry screws at each contact area. But a little voice is saying "That's fine for just hanging something but in this case they will split the cinder blocks when torque is applied"
How does this sound to Those Who Know?
Push-comes-to-shove, lashing.
Better solutions?
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Pete Cresswell

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On 8/29/2015 10:14 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Google claims page not found.

I've been fastening cinder blocks to "block fences", lately. My prefered method is to drill a hole in the block with a hammer-drill. The hole diameter is large enough to accommodate the *head* of a bolt!
Then, fill the hole with an epoxy (I like "SET-PAC EZ" but there are many others, depending on how strong you need the bond). And, set the bolt head into the hole -- using a jig to keep it standing in the correct orientation (e.g., drill a hole in a scrap piece of lumber just large enough for the THREADS of the bolt; set the board ON the cinderblock with the threads protuding through UP the hole)
Once set, you can position your board (or whatever) on the bolt and secure with a large flat washer and nut.
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wrote:

You can use tap cons but they do not really hold that well in concrete blocks. The block is too soft. Squirting some epoxy in the hole and then snugging up the tap con is better.
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(PeteCresswell) posted for all of us...

Sorry, that page not found...

Not being able to see your pix I will give estiguess. How much do they weight and how many? Horizontal or vertical? Tapcons (the blue screws) would likely work. Epoxy method by one poster would work but $$$ All thread rod through the block might work. Like most projects a little engineering is involved.
Shame I can't see the pix...
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Tekkie

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Per Tekkie®:

Try now.
First pic: https://picasaweb.google.com/108149798664924808733/AI#6188590642238079874
I think either Picasa has been moving the furniture around or it's been so long since I started a new album that I forgot... either way, that album had defaulted to Private access. Hopefully Public now.
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Pete Cresswell

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wrote:

I would attach 2x4's or 1x2's to the boards to straddle the blocks. Bolting or gluing the 2x6's to the blocks makes them hard to move, since you've more than doubled the weight.
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On 8/30/2015 6:29 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

If the 2x6 only needs to be restrained side-to-side, front-to-back, rotate the blocks so the cavities are on top. Then, put ~5x5 inch "nubs" on the underside of the 2x6 to fit within the hollows of the cinder blocks. This will keep the boards from shifting -- but not prevent them from being lifted off the blocks.
Note that you might wish to use "half blocks", instead. I don't doubt they would adequately support the kayak's weight as well as the full blocks -- yet would be half the size/weight (and still have a single cavity that could be exploited by these "nubs")
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On Sun, 30 Aug 2015 21:45:49 -0700, Don Y

Best solution yet.
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Per Vic Smith:

It occurred to me, but I had two reservations:
1) Part of the idea of this setup *is* to make it hard to move. Heavier is better and I will apply the fastenings on-site. We're thinking bored kids and the occasional nighttime drunks here....
2) I have zero experience with sand, but it seemed like flipping them hollows-side-up/down would accelerate any tendency for them to sink into the sand.... less surface area...
Right now, my breadboard implementation is using blue screws and it seems solid enough. Installation time comes, I'll remove the screws and flip the blocks over and drill fresh holes.
I think Liquid Nails construction adhesive is also going to come into the picture because experimentation with placing/removing the boat indicates a need for some padding.
Got some of that Norsk multipurpose flooring (the stuff with the scalloped edges so squares can be joined) laying around. It seems pretty durable, so I'll Liquid-Nail it in place for the final setup.
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On Monday, August 31, 2015 at 10:05:00 AM UTC-4, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Then flip the hollows up, fill with rockcrete or sandcrete, insert a large bolt while still wet. Something like a 5/8 inch bolt six inches long, with the head sunk far enough to let the threaded end through your board, tighten a nut on top.
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On 8/31/2015 9:07 AM, TimR wrote:

The problem I've found with (galvanized) bolts used like this is the nut invariably breaks the zinc coating on the threads and, as such, the nut/threads eventually rust. So, I only use this sort of hardware outdoors when I don't EVER intend to loosen the nut!
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On Monday, August 31, 2015 at 4:51:27 PM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:

I didn't think of that, that's a good point.
I wonder if it would be worth wrapping the threads with teflon tape. I know people who do that, not to prevent a leak but to lubricate the fastener and allow easy removal later.
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On 9/1/2015 10:51 AM, TimR wrote:

I learned the hard way. :< I was "too clever, by half" when I made the valve manifolds for the irrigation system. Instead of "cheap, crappy PVC", I opted for galvanized pipe! (This will be more durable!)
Over time, all of the threaded fittings rusted. So, I recently replaced them with solvent welded PVC.

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On 8/31/2015 7:04 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

If that were a problem, you could fill the blocks with cement/concrete (with the exception of a "recess" near the top).
I'd be more worried about *blowing* sand piling up against the blocks and kayak as it would effectively be acting as a windbreak.

You can also fasten a small "nailing surface" (screwing surface?) to each block *permanently* and then attach/remove the actual boards from *that*.

Note that any adhesive will fail when the wood starts to rot. You'll end up with splinters of wood adhering to the blocks and the bulk of the lumber flaking off.
You could explore the synthetic wood products (they're sort of plastic like) to see how they might work.

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Per Don Y:

That is what I intend to use once this thing proves itself conceptually.
I was at Home Depot today looking at deck material, but the stuff I saw was kind of thin - maybe 3/4" actual max thickness, and not that wide.
How about treated lumber (the stuff that's green)?
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On 8/31/2015 4:25 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Yes, the thickness (and price!) was my lament -- I need some 4x12's.

See my "Roof dry rot" thread of 8/19. J Burns suggests treating with a borate solution may give protection. OTOH, you'll also have to deal with salt spray...
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Per Don Y:

Sounds to me like the path of least resistance is to just let them rot and replace as needed. The consequences of failure are seem to be zero.
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On 9/1/2015 5:47 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Except that they may have failed just before you need to set the kayak *on* them (at the start of the season) *or* just before you need to get the kayak *off* them. If the previous solutions that did NOT attach the board to the blocks were rejected, this suggests a board "falling off" would likewise not be desirable.
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On Monday, August 31, 2015 at 7:25:43 PM UTC-4, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

I assume you've heard of screws? ;-)
Two 3/4" boards, screwed together become 1.5" thick, three is 2.25" and so on.
Screwing the layers together in a running bond pattern could get you any width you desired. If it must be "square" at the edges, boards ripped in half would fill the gaps.
http://www.ecostonenw.com/8x8_offset.jpg
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On 8/30/2015 5:48 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Does this "jig" remain in one place? Or, does it need to be "portable"?
How long are the 2x6's (I assume this corresponds to the width of the kayak?)
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