Safe to burn old stockade fencing in woodstove??

I have 10 sections of 25 year old fencing I have to get rid of. Its 6' x 8' - 1" x 3" spruce maby?? I'm sure its not PT.
Is it safe to cut it up, remove the nails and burn it in my wood stove????
I just got a price of $2,000 to remove and install 10 sections of this fence. As much as I hate to do it myself there's no way I'm paying that much!!! Should cost me $500 at most plus my time. I dont pay myself much so the labor is cheap!
Thanks Steve
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If you are sure its not PT or stained or painted. Burning CCA- PT will give you arsenic poisoning, Stain or paint other bad chemicals.
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Posts may be PT? but I'm sure the pickets are not. Never painted, I doubt it was stained, If so it's at least 25 years old . any way to test?
Steve
On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 17:03:09 -0600 (CST), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (mark Ransley) wrote:

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Test for cca I dont know. Contact lumber cos Where do you live , only in the desert would wood last 25 yr as a fence post being untreated. In the midwest untreated posts have rot at 10 yrs. So id say Dont risk it , Arsenic poisoning is serious. And the pickets 25 yr no paint no rot, Sounds like CCA - PT
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I've got a cedar fence, 4 x4 posts and 8 inch wide boards, not treated. Less than 1/10th of the posts indicate any rot and only 2 posts (plu 2 broken boards) have been replaced in a 100-110 foot section in 25 years. Yeah, it's in the desert, kind of, but the fence gets watered from both side all summer long. The rest of my fence is wire fabric with creosote treated posts (buried part) and probaby 1/6th of those have rotted off at the ground level in 25 years. I'm cheap so I just drove steel fence posts 1-2 feet from the old posts and left the old wood attached to the fence.
mark Ransley wrote:

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After 25 years, there probably isn't much of anything left in the wood even if it was treated. The greater the rainfall and snowfall, the less likely there would be anything left. If you have any doubts about using it, just discard the parts of posts that were in the ground and use the rest.
steve wrote:

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What do you mean by stockade? Is this a fence to keep animals? If so, it is unlikely that the wood would be pressure treated. What part of the country do you live in that the fence might be spruce? Where I live there are lots of fences but only the posts are ever treated, unless someone stains the finished fence. And 25 years ago, the posts were mostly not pressure treated but the posts might have been treated with creosote or Penta chlorophenol. I would burn the exposed part of the fence in your stove and discard any parts that were buried.
steve wrote:

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If its CCA , after 25 it will still be there. PT is Pressure treated, its in the wood not on it. Is Arsenic poisoning worth the risk for a little heat. for some yes. By the way people are killed by burning CCA, Slowly, and made sick,
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I live in Massachusetts. The main reason for burning is as a way to get rid of the old fence sections. They want $200 to haul it away (10 sections). We call it stockade fence. We dont have any livestock. The fence is definatly rotting along the ground and pickets are breaking off. Many of the posts are rotted at ground level. I dont intend to burn the posts, just cut up the fence pickets, 1"x3"x6' boards.
Thanks for the warnings??
Steve
On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 04:50:56 -0600 (CST), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (mark Ransley) wrote:

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In southern California, (and other areas) this is also known as Grape Stake fencing
Rick
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If it is really 25 years old I'd be surprised if it is not PT, maybe your climate is different. Even if it isn't PT, softwood like spruce or pine is usually not burned in indoor stoves or fireplaces because of possible creosote build up in chimneys. If you do decide to burn it, why bother to remove the nails?
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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I was thinking the same thing, I'll leave the nails in!
The fence was here when I bought the house 20 years ago. Its in very bad shape, Rotten / broken. I just replaced the post with a 4 x 4 PT post and screwed the old fence in place. That will hold it till spring when I replace the whole thing myself.
Thanks All!!!
Steve
On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 16:35:00 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net (Lawrence Wasserman) wrote:

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I hope you dont burn it where any smoke is upwind , or enclosed, or interior.CCa kills , Arsenic poisoning
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Lawrence Wasserman wrote:

Whoa! just a just plain stupid statement. Forests in the west are primarily coniferous and firewood is usually pine, fir, spruce, etc. So what do you think we burn in stoves and fireplaces?
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yes you burn unreated but un processed
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Hi, If the wood is treated, the color of flame is different. I don't think they'd treat cedar lumber. Tony
mark Ransley wrote:

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Smart guy. The whole point of cedar is that it resist rot. Even cedar siding on houses is often left untreated so that it turns that blue/gray color that many people consider beautiful.
Tony Hwang wrote:

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mark Ransley wrote:

The position of your comment in the thread shows that it is in reply to a statement "softwood like spruce or pine is usually not burned in indoor stoves or fireplaces because of possible creosote build up in chimneys."
I know what untreated is but what is "un processed?" Most people that burn wood do a considerable amount of processing, e.g., cutting the tree down, limbing, sawing blocks, spliting, etc.
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