Rust line in Bathroom Camode - how to remove?


We have a vertical rust line in the bathroom commode. Tried using cleaner and also bleach, but these did not remove the stains. Any suggestions what to use to remove this unsightly stain?
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Les wrote:

The local home center store or hardware store will have liquid rust remover that works like magic. It's in either the plumbing or cleaning product sections. You just squirt in on, and the rust disappears in seconds, usually no rubbing required,
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On Wed, 11 Oct 2006 10:14:07 -0400, "Les"

Toothpaste, comet, iron-out. Are you on a sewer or a septic system?
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Goedjn wrote:

Do NOT use abrasive cleaners in your bowl.
You will regret it.
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Whink works like a charm. Look in the laundry detergent section, in a small copper (rust) colored bottle. You may have to devise a way to let it soak for a couple minutes, e.g., moisten a cloth with enough Whink to allow it to stick to the stain.
I have also heard of people using pumice stone. I've never tried it. You can find small pumice stones in the nail care section of the store (people use them to remove calluses, too) if you want to experiment with it. http://store.markoinc.com/pumicestone.html
Jo Ann
Les wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Never ever use abrasives to clean the inside of a toilet. You will regret the day you did.
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Les wrote:

Hi, CLR?
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Les wrote:

Zud or Barkeeper's Friend, both available at your local grocer. Acidic
cleansers; bases like bleach won't reduce rust to iron.
Next question is, do you have iron water pipes?
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Zud I knew about. Checked a few places here for it and NG. Wally World had Barkeeper's Friend. Never heard of it but I gave it a try. Works good.
Got it for something else but tried it on a cheapo plastic outdoor table. Had a steel coffee can sitting on it for a long time through rains. Left a heavy rust ring. Couple of applications and it totally removed it.
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Les,
Do you want to use what the Pros use? It's call a Pumice Stick. Lowe's did sell it and you'll find it at a specialty cleaning supply warehouse. You wet the end and run it around the rust line and it's gone. I never thought such an item existed much less would work but it does. Price, about $2.
J
Les wrote:

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I had an impossible toilet ring. I bought a Pumice Stick. The one I bought, I found in the cosmetic section. It was about the same thickness as a bar of soap but about half as big. It is also used for lady's nails. Anyway....I tried it on the ring. It looked like it was not going to be very easy. I had read a tip somewhere on Usenet to use plain white vinegar.
Take plain vinegar and pour about 8 oz in the water. Take paper towels and line the ring so the towels soak up the vinegar and leave for an hour or longer.
Then use the pumice stick. It worked with much less elbow grease.
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Joey wrote:

Pumice is an abrasive. Do not use abrasives in the bowl. You will regret it. It will make bowl more susceptible to staining in the future, and harder to clean next time.
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wrote:

Only way to keep your toilet from staining with iron is to remove the source of the iron. If you do that, it won't matter how "susceptable" the bowl is, and if you don't you might as well get used to either looking at rust, or scrubbing.
If it's organic iron, and below the waterline, a scrubbing with a nylon brush, and then a letting a good dose of bleach (*OR* iron-out, but not both), sit overnight should work.
Is the toilet cistern also rust-stained? If so, fix the water-supply. If not, what's rusting between the two places to produce the stain?
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Goedjn wrote:

What is "organic" iron?
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wrote:

Iron eating bacteria. As opposed to suspended iron oxide.
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Goedjn wrote:

"organic iron" is bacteria?
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Goedjn wrote:

Has the water pressure from that line (or others) been steadily diminishing over time? Are those lines iron? Rust stained porcelain is a giveaway that the pipes are rotting out, and should be replaced with CPVC or (better yet, if you can get a torch to them) copper as soon as possible.
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Les wrote:

heh, I like the replies. all i've seen will work, but the rust will come back.
to permanently remove the rust stain, get a water softener. just bought my house, never lived with a water softener before. amazed at what it does.
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Les wrote:

I hope you didn't use anything abrasive

Bleach does NOT remove rust stains

"The Works" bowl cleaner. 20% Hydrochloric acid. Walmart, $1.50 for 32oz.
Let the bowl dry, then squirt it directly on the stain and go away for half an hour. Come back, scrub and flush.
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