Roofing Questions...

As shingles blow off of my aging roof in high wind storms, I'm preparing to have someone install a new roof...
Given that it's cheaper to just lay a new layer on top of the old, what are the Pros and Cons of laying roof down on top of the old, versus stripping the old layer off first?
Thanks
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Hi, Removing old layer is prefered. You can inspect underneath for possible trouble spot damaged sheathing, etc. and no extra weight. You already lost some blown off. Tony
SJP wrote:

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to
are
stripping
There is equity in them thar homes! Do not do things "cheaper". It will almost always come back and bite you.
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to
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Cheaper in the long run maybe, but sooner or later you or someone else will have to strip the roof back, as most areas won't allow more than one old layer of roofing. Next roof job you will for sure have to strip, and you will have twice as much debris to dispose of. Over time, this will only get more expensive. Plus, you will get a look at your roof boards, and can see if how good of shape they are. You may have some rotting. Better to catch that now that hide it for another decade or two.
Unless you are planning on selling in the next few years, I'd do it right the first time.
Dave

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DaveG wrote:

I suggest you look at the info on the roofing material and consult your local building code people. Roofing over the original roofing is certainly approved in many places, in fact, roofing over it twice may be acceptable. The primary problem is the weight of the material and after 3 layers you may exceed the weight capability of the roof.
You don't need to take the original layer off to tell the condition of the roof sheathing. If it gives a lot walking on it, it needs replacement. A little flex is of no concern. If the sheathing is rotting (why would it rot if the roof doesn't leak and their is adequate ventilation?) you will certainly know it when you walk across it. Deterioration, not necessarily rotting, is the main concern. Roof sheating commonly lasts for 50 years. It's all those holes from reroofing that ruins the sheathing.
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On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 01:22:16 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

Yes. In New York, effective January 2003 (just this year), the state requires that no more than two layers of roofing material be allowed on a roof. This meant that I had to strip off all three old roofs from my 1930s house before I could reroof with new sheathing (decking), felt, ice and water shield, and 30-year architectural shingles. But that's ok because I would have done so anyway just to make sure I had a sound safe roof.
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Stripped roof will last about 25 yrs an unstripped roof about 15 maybe 20yrs.Do to heat build up etc.
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PoCambo wrote:

Bull! Think about where the heat come from and how an additional layer cause more heat? Do the manufactures of roofing materials decrease the guaranteed life if applied over an existing roof? It says other things about the gurantee on my roofing packages, but it doesn't say that.
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- SJP -

preparing to

what are

stripping
- Nehmo - If there is only one layer [1] of shingles currently on the roof. If the existing job was reasonably well done - proper exposure, straight courses. If there are only a few shingles missing. If the existing shingles aren't curled.
Then re-roof. Use the butt-up method.
Re-roofing is easier, safer, takes less time, and makes for less risk if rain catches you during the job. And, of course, re-roofing is substantially cheaper. In this situation, "cheaper" doesn't equate to inferior.
[1] All codes that I've looked at allow three layers.
-- ******************** * Nehmo Sergheyev * ********************
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It all depends on your budget. If you have lots of extra cash then rip off the old and have a new roof installed. If you're on a budget and the old rood didn't leak then you can go ahead and re-roof. I know lots of people with two layers of roof with no problems. If your old roof is curling up then you may have a problem. Also, if you walk around the roof and there are many spongy areas then you will have to rip off the old. I piad 1,500 for a new roof - if I had to have the old roof ripped off the new roof would have been double the price I paid.
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Thanks for all the replies. I guess it's left to me to determine whether or not it's worth it to increase the cost just to get a look at how things are underneath. We don't have any leaks, but we do have some ants in the summer. I'll see how much the guy wants and then go from there. Thanks again.

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SJP wrote:

Large ants in the attic? May be carpenter ants, which are a pretty sure sign of damaged wood. I like doing things right - especially when it involves someone else's money :o) Bite the bullet, tear off the old roof, put the new one on right and then relax for the next 20 years, or so. Get a termite inspection done while you're at it. If shingles are blowing off, you are overdue to get a new roof. Ask a couple of neighbors, with the best looking older roofs, for product and contractor referrals. Good luck.
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