Roofing Question about water getting under Shingled Roof?

Having problems with water getting through the 30lb underlayment and water damage showing on the soffit. Thought leakage would occur with 12 installed skylights but it's just the eaves and paper peeling off a drywall version of soffit board. Only thing I could think of is that rain is being blown between the flashing and shingles then finding it's way down the plywood. Has anyone ever fixed this problem by running a bead of caulking on top of the L-flashing?
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Are you sure it isn't coming from one of the skylights and running down the inside of the roof dumping onto your soffits?
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Randd01 wrote:

I'm absolutely positive that it's not coming from the skylights because they are scattered in the middle of the roof. Water damage is only occurring on soffits that face North, which is the direction of most storms. Thinking of calling in a Roofer to hotmop that area but thought about caulking the area above the L-Flashing and the portion of shingles that overhang the roof by an inch. That idea, came after thinking that rain might be forced through that gap by heavy wind. Water is not coming down in buckets from the eaves but just enough after three years to make the paper delaminate from a drywall core that is specified to be weather resistant.
    Thanks for your reply-
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On Fri, 17 Oct 2003 21:03:25 -1000, Bob wrote:

Just a thought, I don't know where you are located, but what you are describing is typical of an ice dam. Are you in a colder climate?
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thunder wrote:

I live on an island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, Aloha
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On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 02:30:03 -1000, Bob wrote:

So much for the ice dam theory. ;-)
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Is the house brick? Is there a brick wall above the leaking roof?

12
it's
a
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Art Begun wrote:

It's a two-story, double wall house that is finished with Sto. Just the thought of scaffolding up there to cut out and patch some drywall is something out of a Steven King Novel.
    Thanks for the reply-

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Bob you could try roofing cement along that edge, it won't do any harm and that would pinpoint the problem. Sometimes leaks are hard to find. I had one travel on a roof ten feet before it showed any signs of a leak.
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Randd01 wrote:

Just glad I didn't use Monier Tile, leaks on that kind of roofing is like trying to find a needle in a haystack. Thought about roofing cement but I have to tear off about 3 squares of Thickbutt and if a cold application will not work, the fun and games will begin when I have to repeat the process and start all over again at square one. A Roofer is scheduled to stop by Monday, gave him leads on a couple jobs in the past so hopefully I can drain him for some knowledge or get a reasonable price.
    Thanks for sticking with this thread-
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"Bob" wrote in message

12
it's
The L flashing replaces the drip edge, or you have drip edge and referring to it as L flashing. Does the shingles overhang this edge? If not, they should. If this is the problem, several ways to approach. First find out if this is the problem before I start blabbing away.
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Ted wrote:

A drip edge sounds more like it and the shingles overhang one inch. The flashing was basically a sheet of copper 6 inches wide, bent at a ninety degree angle with a ~10 degree flair to deflect water on one side. If I remember correctly, 30lb felt was used for underlayment and the drip edge was applied on top of it. Is it possible for water to be blown into the space between a drip edge and shingles?
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"Bob" wrote in message

Possible that the starter strips that are installed before the first course of shingles are aligned with the first course? The first course of shingles should be offset from the starter so the seams are not lined up. Also, up here in the cold area, we put the water/ice shield over the drip edge. Before water/ice guard came out, we installed the felt after the drip edge on the eave edge, and after the felt up the rake edge.
With a one inch overhang of shingles, I would doubt it would blow in, but anything is possible.
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"Ted" wrote in message

Drip edge down first on eave edge then underlayment. Up rakes the underlayment down first then drip edge.
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Dirp egde should be installed under the underlayment
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