Roof vents

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Before you seal it shut, consider that code typically requires a bathroom to have either a fan or window. So, if you don;'t have a window that can open, it may very well be a code violation. As well as, IMO, foolish.
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The exhaust vents I have seen have some kind of flapper installed to keep out wind, insects, rodents, etc. The flapper is normally closed until the airflow from the exhaust fan blows it open. You could certainly remove the flapper, but then you would probably have other issues with drafts, insects, etc.
I have had similar issues with wall vents in the past. When the wind blows it creates a suction that pulls air through the vent and causes the flapper to "flap" in the wind, thus making noise in the process. My current wall vents do not have that problem, so I don't know if the springs are stronger or if it's just a matter of being located out of the wind.
I suppose you could install a screened vent instead of a flappered vent, but I would be concerned this would eventually clog up with dust and other debris. This would also leave an opening for drafts to come into the house.
I am assuming the old vents did not make noise, so I would look at the differences between the old and new vents. Maybe the old vents used a different design, or maybe they were just oriented differently so they didn't catch the wind.

You should always run the bathroom fan when showering and let it run for several minutes afterwards to remove the moisture from the bathroom. It may not matter as much in an old drafty house, but in modern sealed houses you're just asking for mold problems if you don't use the fan.
If you don't use the bathroom often, you should still leave it functional in case you need to remove "odors". Not to mention, many folks have "bashful bladders" and appreciate the noise of an exhaust fan to mask the sounds of nature, so to speak.
However, there are really quiet bathroom fans. I installed Panasonic fans in our house and you can't even hear them running unless you get really quiet and purposely listen for them.

I don't use ours as often as I should, but the kitchen fan matters most when you're boiling water (lots of steam to remove) or if you burn something on the stove (lots of smoke to remove).
Good luck,
Anthony Watson Home Cookin Recipe Software www.mountain-software.com
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