Roof ridge vent: a DIY project?

I am a fairly competent DIYer. Need to install ridge vents. Could I screw this up? Seems simple enough. Was hoping someone with experience could teel me:
1) Most common mistake, things to watch out for. 2) best kind of vent to install.
Thanks! Todd in Cincy
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Todd W. Roat wrote:

A few years ago I hired a roofer to pull two layers of shingles, check the plywood underlayment holding up the shingles, and install a ridge vent and a fresh set of shingles.
Part of the ridge vent installation procedure is to cut a slit one or two inches wide in the roof underlayment to let the air through. My lack of talent for free hand sawing of a straight line forty feet long made me glad I was not on the roof making the cut.
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I think that John has mixed up "ridge vent" and "sofit vent". The ridge vent goes on the front and back of the house just below the peak of the roof. The "sofit vent" or vents go on the sofit, the underside of the roof edge. I'm afraid that I can't give you much advice in this area either Todd and I am paying to have someone do this as well. Hope you get a response from someone who can give you the requested feedback.
-G

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In alt.home.repair

No, a ridge vent does exactly what it says, runs on the ridge. I think he would have no trouble installing one. Pop a couple of chalk lines to saw by. Use a circular saw with a cheap blade and rip the lines. Tear up the waste leaving the gap. Install the ridge per the manf recommendations and cap with shingle tabs. Nothing to it.
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Todd wrote: >I am a fairly competent DIYer. Need to install ridge vents. Could I

Sure, no problem. As long as your roof pitch is safely walkable, climb on up there and carefully remove all the existing ridge caps where you'll want the vent. Save 'em. Now snap a chalk line along both sides of the ridge about 2 inches down. Get a "roofers blade" on your circ saw, 'cause you'll be cutting through some metal, and set the depth just a quarter to a half inch deeper than the depth of the plywood substrate. Test cut a bit and measure the resultant opening. Adjust chalkline as needed, and cut the entire ridge just up to the rakeboards, even if it'll only ventilate to the overhang, and it'll look much straighter, not upswept or dropped at the ends. Install a couple new caps at the rake end(s). Apply the ridge venting to the entire ridge, something with a bug-barrier fabric preferred, with some fasteners that'll _just_ hold it down while you're installing the ridge caps with the provided two-inch or so roofing nails. Tom Someday, it'll all be over....
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On 1 Jun 2004 06:41:21 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@uc.edu (Todd W. Roat) wrote:

I did my ridge vent last year and can give you a little advice that is fresh in my mind.
1. Don't make the slits wider than necessary. Follow the instructions that come with your ridge vents exactly. (I wanted to make them wider - big mistake).
2. I bought a new saw blade and wore it completely out on the first 12 inches I cut. It lasted less than 20 seconds. ( Don't try to saw thru gravel coated shingles. Cut them with a knife.)
3. I have a hip roof so I didn't have enough 'ridge' area so I had to run the ridge vent down the hips half way. You are only going to tackle that job only once so don't be stingy with the ridge vent. They sell special ridge vent for hips.
The job is easy enough for the homeowner but it takes longer than you might think. Have some emergency covering for the event of rain.
Les
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Thanks for all the input. Think I will give it a try. Determined to use my circ saw as opposed to kniwfe for time sake - will try a carbide roofer blade. Now it seems I have to pick a roof vent - seems there a trillion brands. Consensus is to use the baffled vent ones that conduct airflow out better and keep weather out.
snipped-for-privacy@uc.edu (Todd W. Roat) wrote in message

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