Roof Problem

I own a 1996 house with a CertainTeed shingled roof. Everytime we get high winds the shingles flap in the wind until they break off. I probably loose 10 shingles a year. Does anyone know a method to fix this problem? (Short of a new roof.) I thought about using an adhesive caulk and glue each and every shingle.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phil wrote:

Eight year old roof and you want to glue down a million tabs. I would go for the new roof and this time get one that is designed for high winds. Also make sure it is put one during the time of year when it will have an opportunity to get good and hot not long after it is on.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phil wrote:>I own a 1996 house with a CertainTeed shingled roof. Everytime we get

shingles, check the placement and quantity of the fasteners. They should be about an inch above the exposure line(where a shingle laps over the underlying one), right above the tab cut-out. Staples should be parallel to the length of the shingle. Also, check whether or not the roofers used too much air pressure and sank the fasteners beyond flush with the surface of the shingles. Tom Someday, it'll all be over....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They sell roofinf cement used on rolled roofing that you could use to glue each tab down. It's not that hard to do and is a lot cheaper then a new roof. I have repaired many roofs like that. Seems to be a comman problem with some types of shingles.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phil wrote:

Roof put on by builder? You might check the brand/style of shingle to see how long it is warranteed. Our Elk roof info was on the internet and showed the prorated value by age. Of course, if winds were higher than the roofing is rated for, then it probably won't apply. Unusual roof? Steep? File insurance claim?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Might still be under warranty. Call Certainteed if they are still in business.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sounds like an Owens Corning shingle, I would double check the manufacturer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, they are Certainteed. I found out that they were stapled to the roof, not nailed. All the houses in my neighborhood have the same problem.
Also, a local roofer told me that you do not need to remove the paper from the seal strip like years ago. Is this true?
BTW, Are Owens Corning shingles poor quality?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phil wrote:>No, they are Certainteed. I found out that they were stapled to the

I've stapled many a roof, and as long as the staples are parallel to the shingle, and properly driven, they hold fine. You get the occasional roofer in a hurry, not worrying about staple placement, and then things add up. Correct, you don't need to remove the separator strip from shingles nowadays. It's there to keep 'em from sticking together in the bundle. OC shingles are of good quality, no affiliation. Tom Someday, it'll all be over....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Phil" wrote in message

Several conditions must be met when using staples. First, staples is a cost cutting method when installing shingles, no Government Agency allows shingles to be stapled in their specifications. Many high wind areas around the country prohibit the use of staples (code violation), I know this from being a roofer for 30+ years & being a licensed contractor in a high wind area. Certain styles of shingles are not to be stapled per manufacturer, you did not say which style you have (3 tab, Landmark TL, Horizon etc.). When all of the conditions are met to staple fastening, the staple must penetrate at least 3/4" into the sheathing OR at least 1/8" through thinner decking.
The paper was never to be removed on shingles. Manufacturers have been printing on the cellophane (DO NOT REMOVE) for at least 15 years, this was because those not familiar with installation were removing. When removed, and wind catches underneath, entire roof coverings are blown off. All shingles are not alike, they put shingles through flexibility tests, wind tests, composite tests etc.
I would make a call to your local building dept., inquire about _if_ staples are allowed.
Owens Corning is a retail shingle, considered the bottom of the line covering in my area.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wild Bill:
The shingles on my house right now are CertainTeed, not sure which model.
I plan to replace them in three to five years (if I can get them to last.)
My county is not typically high wind area, it is just that I built a house on a ridge in a valley, on a farmer's field. No trees, the mountains funnel storms to my house. Most houses in my neighborhood have the same builder and the same roof problems.
Please give me advice on the new roof. This is my plan:
1. remove old roof. 2. Replace any plywood, if needed. 3. Replace roof with new paper, and CertainTeed Shingle (Model TBD) 4. Have contractor use six nails per shingle.
I read in Consumer Reports that the heavyiest shingle does not always mean most wind resisteant nor longest lasting. Do you agree? They also suggested using six nails per shingle in high wind areas. Do you agree?
Which shingle make/model would you use for my house?
Thanks, Phil

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.