Repairing Cupped Roof Shingles

Here's the problem: https://www.flickr.com/photos/90278919@N00/22362710755/in/dateposted-public/
Starting from the bottom course, my plan is to use a heat gun to soften them until they lay flat, then put a bead of roofing cement from a caulk gun along the bottom edge of the shingle and press it into the one below while somehow keep weight on it for a hour or so. When I looked at the cements in my local Ace Hardware store, none said anything about this use. All the brands mostly mentioned sealing cracks and seams.
Any other suggestions?
Thanks,
R1
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Here's the problem: https://www.flickr.com/photos/90278919@N00/22362710755/in/dateposted-public/
Starting from the bottom course, my plan is to use a heat gun to soften them until they lay flat, then put a bead of roofing cement from a caulk gun along the bottom edge of the shingle and press it into the one below while somehow keeping weight on it for a hour or so. When I looked at the cements in my local Ace Hardware store, none said anything about this use. All the brands mostly mentioned sealing cracks and seams.
Any other suggestions?
Thanks,
R1
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On 10/21/2015 10:20 AM, Rebel1 wrote:

Are you sure they *will* lay flat? I.e., that the house hasn't "moved" and the flashing under them *buckled*?

In our "built up" (flat) roof, I've used "ACE Fibered Plastic Roof Cement" between layers of 80# felt to repair sections that I've cut out, in the past. It adhered the successive layers quite well.
But, then again, I was troweling it on an exposed, flat surface and then laying *another* flat surface atop it. Getting it *between* courses of shingles may be problematic.
Any reason you don't just want to remove those few courses and affect a proper repair? At the very least, so you can more closely examine what might be happening *beneath* them to cause this section to buckle...
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On 10/21/2015 2:03 PM, Don Y wrote:

You raise some good points. I'll investigate them further. The house (and its original shingles) is 16 years old, in Bradenton Florida, so I don't know how much it could have moved, say, due to high winds. Funny thing is that the garage ceiling paint is peeling at a point that appears to be under the cupped shingles, but when I measure, the peeling is about three feet further back (i.e., away from the garage entrance. When I look in the attic, I can't see heavily stained sheathing.
I though I had a spare bundle of shingles in the attic; I don't.
A roofing guy was supposed to come over last Saturday. He stood me up.
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Generally, when shingles start to cup, it's time for a new roof. But we all tend to try to make them last as long as possible, since a new roof is costly. 16 years is probably getting close to needing a new roof if they are standard 3 tab shingles.
Leaks are not always at the same spot there is a leak, water runs to a lower point or finds a place to drip thru.
If you dont have spare shingles, you might be able to find something close in color, or just re-roof that whole side of the house. I did that once on a garage, because one side was much worse than the other side because of getting more sun. I just replaced all the shingles on that side, including the ridge caps. I planned to do the other side a few years later, and since I used a plain color, anything should have been a close match. But I sold the property so I never had to do it.
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On Wed, 21 Oct 2015 21:52:51 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

So you mean farther up. It's normal for water to leak one place and run down hill and come out, or damage the paint , somewhere lower.

For 20-year shingles it's close. Some shingles are warranted for 30.

Google maps uses shingle color to determine where one house ends and the next house begins. You should see what it has to say about your old house.
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On 10/21/2015 2:00 PM, Rebel1 wrote:

Ground settling/subsidence, lumber drying out/changing shape, differences in sun/wind/pastrami exposure, etc.

Could be a small leak that has saturated insulation? Look for mold as well. Can you see/feel *under* (above?) the peeled paint?

Of course not! And, when you go to purchase a bundle/third, the salesman -- who's name will be Murphy -- will tell you that the style you want is no longer available. *But*, they have a new BRIGHT GREEM shingle that, by coincidence, is on sale this month...

If anything like the folks here, he was probably watching "The Game" (pick a game, any game...)
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I forgot to mention in my prior reply. I've fixed these by putting roofing cement under them. Then drive a few roofing nails thru the surface, (where you put the cement). Then cover the nail heads with the roofing cement. It's not perfect and may show the cement if it's a light colored roof, but thats better than a leak until you can replace the whole roof.
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