Repairing a tubeless handcart tire

I have a handcart with tubeless tires. One of the tires has developed a leak in the sidewall. It goes completely flat in about a day. (I wish they had used a solid rubber tire.)
What is the best way to repair this tire? Would one of those liquid tire sealants work? Thank you in advance for all replies.
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Daniel Prince wrote:

I've never had any luck with those tire sealers on a small tire. I think they rely on centrifical force and the tire heating up when driving down the highway. Depending upon the size of the tire, you may be able to get an inner tube to fit it. I had the same problem with one of my front tractor tires and a few applications of the sealer didn't work, but the inner tube fixed it. If the tire is too small for an inner tube, maybe some sort of spray in insulating foam to make it semi-solid. I never tried it though, so I can't vouch for any success.
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I had the same problem and took the wheels to Walmart and had some new tires put on. The new ones were a lot heavier duty.
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<< What is the best way to repair this tire? >>
1) Remove tire 2) Discard tire in trash 3) Go to Farm & Fleet, tire store, whatever, and buy replacement (they're cheap) 4) Install tire, live happily ever after. HTH
Joe
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| << What is the best way to repair this tire? >> | | 1) Remove tire | 2) Discard tire in trash | 3) Go to Farm & Fleet, tire store, whatever, and buy replacement (they're | cheap) | 4) Install tire, live happily ever after. HTH | | Joe
And they're not a heck of a lot more expensive than a tube, in fact, esp when you factor in your time and aggravation.
I did however have good luck with the tubeless tire stuff you squirt in thru the valve. Take the tire off, fill it, add air until pressure is at max listed for the tire (I usually go a few pounds even past that, to about 22 pounds for tractor tires), handle, rotate, tip, flip, etc., the tire to spread the stuff all over inside real well. PUt it on the tractor and go ride in circles for 5 minutes or so. Cabeat: IF you ever decide to take that tire off and replace it, you are going to have ONE heck of a mess of sticky crap all over the rim inside!!
Pop
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this would be the way to solve the problem period
No more flat tires, even in the most hazardous operating environments. Full of genuine Arnco flatproofingT, your tires will roll right over spikes, scrap metal, nails, rocks... you name it. You could even shoot them with an elephant gun, and they'd keep right on rolling!
http://www.arnconet.com/shouldbefull.htm
Wayne

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Daniel Prince wrote:

You could repair it the correct way if you plan on keeping the tire. Patch and / or plug the hole. You'll probably be able to find the cold vulcanizing materials at your local auto parts store. You could also take the assembly to the local truck tire repair folks ( industrial ) and have them foam filled. (Similar to a previous post.) Then they will last forever ( almost, at least until the tread wears off.)
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put bigger tires on it more air takes longer to leak out when you get holes.
I put tubes in my hand cart tires when it was new because they came with default leaks, then squoze a full bottle of Briggs & Stratton stop leak in each one. They still leak, I sure do wish they held more air.

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I had the same problem with garden tractor trailer tires.
If you are too cheap to buy a new tire (I was), then get a bottle of "Slime" at Harbor Freight. There are other brands of tire sealant around in hardware and auto supply stores.
First dunk the tire in a water bath to find out exactly where in the sidewall the leak(s) are.
Then, follow the instructions: remove valve stem, squirt several ounces of the Slime into the tire, replace the valve stem and inflate to the proper pressure.
Then put the leaky side down and hit the tire HARD flat on the ground to force the Slime into the leaks. Retest for leaks in the water bath, if it still leaks, repeat hitting on the ground and retesting.
I was able to get several more years of service out of my tires before I finally got tired of re-inflating them every month or so and bought new tires.
To prevent the problem from recurring with the new tires, protect them from the sun's UV rays as these rays rot the tires.
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