Repair front porch paint

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On Mon, 10 Jun 2013 10:19:44 +0200, nestork

And exactly what do you not understand about using PVA as an "additive" to patching cement? Is it not "fresh" concrete? I'm not alking about a primer or a sealer - I'm talking about an additive to fresh patching cement..
And even IF I was talking about using it as a primer, the alkalinity of the fresh concrete used for the patch would DEFINITELY have an effect on the pva applied to the old concrete, wouldn't it???

And I guess we really don't know how or why the PVA crosslinks to become a solid rather than an emulsion in the concrete while it remains an emulsion when used as a wood glue. All I know is what I've been told and the results the old guy next door has had using BondFast white glue as a concrete patching additive.and what I've learned by doing some internet searches on the subject, trying to figure out the "why".

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I'm no expert on this stuff either.
But, I do know that PVA wood glue re-emulsifies if it gets wet and stays wet for a long time, and that concrete bonding agents are made so that they DON'T re-emulsify if they stay wet for a long time because it's often necessary to repair concrete in areas that are wet for long periods. You wouldn't have confidence in your repair if you couldn't count on the glue not to come apart on you.
And, I just don't accept that if PVA has poor alkalinity, that using it in fresh concrete is going to improve it's performance in any significant way, including making it more moisture resistant. If you can find a credible web site that says it does, I'll read it carefully, but otherwise, I just don't believe that.
--
nestork


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On Sat, 8 Jun 2013 20:17:20 +0200, nestork

Using your "nestor" scraper on a concrete porch would waste a month of Sundays. A hardwood scraper works MUCH better and quicker for the first go-round. Just cut a hardwood board with a taper down to roughly 1/8 to 3/16 inch - about 3 or 4 inches wide - and use that to scrape the goo off into a metal dustpan, cake-pan, shovel, or whatever to dispose of it. Use a "gel" paint remover containing Methyllene Chloride and DO NOT get it on your skin or in your eyes etc.
If there is much left after the first application and scraping, a second application and scraping is often effective - and then you wash it off, preferably with a pressure washer, working AWAY from the house - and wearing goggles or a full face shield. After washing with water a stiff bristle brush will remove any remains. Then etch with muriatic acid, patch any hollows with modified patching cement (or a strong sand-mix concrete mixed with BondFast or other PVA adhesive in place of about quarter of the water) and coat the concrete with your choice of concrete finish - FlexRock works well and stands up - there are others - including the epoxy garage-floor kits you can buy from the BORG or other building supply stores.

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Higgs Boson wrote:

Just a thought . . . , maybe you could try using http://tinypic.comto upload photos. I've used that and it works well for me. Photos would definitely help.
About the lead paint issue -- yes, it is something to think about and to be careful about. But, if it is your own home, and you do it yourself (meaning you don't hire someone else to do the work for you), then you are not required to follow the new stupid U.S. federal rules for lead paint removal.
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