Removing Hard Wood Flooring Next to Cabinets


We're going to be removing hardwood flooring that is in the kitchen which has the cabinetry built over top of it. The faces of the cabinet structure is not completely perpendicular to the floor but instead of a 90-degree cutout. So the cabinet frame goes up about three inches, then comes out about three inches, and then continues up the rest of the way. How are we to cut out the hardwood from below this cutout?
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How do you know the cabinets are on top of the flooring? It is common for cabinets to be installed first, then flooring. Why do you want to remove the flooring anyway?
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Today that's common. In the olden days, in better homes, the floor came first, then the cabinets. Everything didn't used to be built as cheaply as possible. -----
- gpsman
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So, considering the the hardwood goes underneath the cabinets what would be the best approach in this situation to remove the wood under these lips so that tile can take it's place?
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I don't know, and my imagination suggests it might be difficult.
I'd check with the best tool rental place in town and ask them what they've got that might do the job. I think there's a small horizontal saw that can get within about a 1/4-1/8", but I'm not sure about that.
Then I'd consider chiseling it out as close as practical with the plan of trimming out the kickplate out to cover the joint with baseboard, or running the tile up the kickplate. -----
- gpsman
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You want a Crane toe-kick saw. It has a small circular blade that can get under toe-kicks. It cuts virtually flush with the vertical face, however, you may be able to remove the vertical facing in the toe-kick to get the saw closer to the cabinet frame.
You can either rent one at your local rental store or buy one on-line and then sell it on ebay when you are finished.
wrote:

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wrote:

Crain.
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wrote:

You've already wasted more time fiddling with the question than it would have taken to just remove or jack up the cabinets. Get on with it.
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EXT, thank you very much; just what I was looking for.
Deke: lol, thanks for your encouragement.
We are not undertaking the project for another two weeks...
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<snip>

Totally concur with this view. Messing with an unfamiliar rental tool will not accomplish much more than frustrate you and set you project back seral days. Cabinets need to be set on top of flooring anyhow so your diswasher will fit right. HTH
Joe
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I'm not sure I agree. The cabinets are not very robust and removing them to take up the wood floor underneath them would not guarantee that we get them back in. The tool does not look very difficult to use =)
Why would using this tool to cut the hardwood at the cabinet seams affect the flooring underneath the cabinets and the dishwasher? The existing wood floor would still be underneath the cabinets. I guess I don't quite understand.
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If they are that rinky-dink, why not replace them with something better?

Stop and thnk about installing a new dishwaher (they don't last forever, you know). Most cabinets are made to the height of the dishwasher, so if you raise the floor in front the dishwasher won't clear the upper opening. This problem has been mentioned in this NG several times.
Joe
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replying to GG.and.UN., downdraft wrote:

I had exactly the same challenge. I had built my cabinets on top of the finished floor (random width oak). Due to a flood within the house I had to remove both oak and subfloor.
The cabinets could not be moved temporarily because they were specially made and would be damaged.
So I removed the 4 inch "kick board" under the front bottom edge...then took a rotary saw and a temporary cutting guide on the floor, the length of the cabinet, and drew a line on the floor along the spot the kick board ran.
I then sawed on the entire line 3/4" deep and removed the oak planking up to that sawed line.
I then installed the replacement oak flooring up to the cut line. To hide the cut and the seam where the new wood met the old, I replaced a "kick board" over the cut line and seam, thus hiding the seams and cuts...looks like new.
Note, I removed the subfloor as well, up to that line, and butted the new subfloor and did the new oak last.
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message

What you need is to buy or rent a Crain Toe Kick saw. It fits under the overhand and cuts the floor flush with the back or side walls. Google the saw and you will see how it works.
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Joe is somehow assuming that you want the floor out from under the cabinets which is exactly what you are NOT proposing to do, so ignore Joe's comments.
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