Removing dried polyurethane from bathtub?

The previous owner of my house had cedar boards put over the drywall in the bathrooms, then applied polyurethane to them himself. Unfortunately, he hadn't heard of that marvelous new invention called masking tape.
Is there any way to remove the drips and overlaps of polyurethane from the fiberglass bathtub and other areas without hurting the tub? The yellowish polyurethane really looks ugly on the white tub.
Thanks for your time and help! -dan z-
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If tub is ceramic a sharp razorblade will do it. Residue could be cleaned with paint remover.
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slate_leeper wrote:

First, be sure that the tub actually IS fiberglass. Not saying it isn't but I'd think it is more likely acrylic.
Either way it can be physically removed. The coarser the material you use the more damage will be done to the fiberglass (or acrylic). That damage can be polished out with finer and finer materials.
If there isn't all that much, you could use auto rubbing compound on a pad. It will physically abrade the poly AND the fiberglass but is fine enough so that the abrasion on the fiberglass won't show, it will be polished. Try first on an inconspicuous area. If there is a LOT of poly, you could do the same thing with a small lambs wool bonnet on a polisher at a SLOOOOW speed. You have to be careful to neither cut through the gel coat nor heat it (friction).
I have a fiberglass table on the lanai and sometimes manage to get a cigarette burn on it; easily removed with rubbing compound and a buffing wheel on a Dremel tool.
The alternative to physical removal is chemical paint removers but I don't know how they behave with fiberglass - which is polyester resin - or acrylic; styrene can be used as a thinner for polyester resin, don't know what it does to cured polyester.
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I didnt see the part it was fiberglass so , im wrong.
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Removing the nasties on this tub is so likely to turn out badly, it might be wise to live with it for a while. Consider a fancier shower curtain, kept closed, for example. Eventually a bathroom remodel will mean a new tub, and your problems will then be history. Meanwhile, you have my sympathy. Joe
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Joe wrote:

I've been following this thread, trying to wrap my mind around the concept of putting poly over cedar.
As to OPs basic problem- I'd try careful scraping with a razor blade in one of those handle things, and then a good coat of wax (on side walls only, of course.) OP can also get a can of spray paint in a matching color, from a boat or RV shop that works on plastic toys. (As a kid, I was able to match an obscure shade of tan on a boat side rail with no problem. Patch vanished.)
But previous poster is right- unlikely visitors will notice or care, if they can get past the shiny cedar.
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wrote:

Hi all,
Thanks much for your help! I tried a couple of the suggestions, and found that very careful use of the razor blade did remove most of the polyurethane nicely. Holding the blade at a very shallow angle was important. Sometimes scraping the blade backwards, as if sharpening it, worked best. This was where the brush strokes were thinnest. Heavy areas, such as drips, just popped right off when using the razor. I've got most of the polyurethane off one of the tubs and also the shower stall. Still working on the other tub.
I also liked the paint-over-it idea, and will probably do this in a couple of spots that I can't reach with the razor blade.
BTW, I am somewhat of a perfectionist when it comes to my house, and when I see something like this it keeps bothering me until I HAVE to fix it. Waiting until the tub needs replacing is not an option.
As far as putting polyurethane over cedar - perhaps he did it in the bathrooms to prevent mold/mildew on damp raw wood? Anyhow, I actually like the looks of it better than the raw wood, which is still in one of the bedrooms. I will be applying polyurethane in there too. Fortunately, I have heard of masking tape <G>.
Thanks again for your thoughtful assistance! -dan z-
-- Protect your civil rights! Let the politicians know how you feel. Join or donate to the NRA today! http://membership.nrahq.org/default.asp?campaignid=XR014887
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