Removing a radiator: good idea?

Hi,
In my bedroom I have a conventional hot-water cast iron radiator. I like the heat it provides, but I don't like so many other things about it: it occupies space under a window, my roomba gets stuck underneath it, it's not particularly beautiful, it collects a lot of dust.
I'm currently in the process of designing bedroom cabinets and have an opportunity to equip them with Hydrotherm radiators (2 at 8400 BUT each). We have one in the bathroom and love it. So the plan is to remove the cast iron radiator and replace it with two of these.
However, I am hesitating because it seems like a radical change. Any disadvantages to what I'm planning that I may be missing?
Thank you!
Sam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When growing up in the Chicago area, my parents house, built in the 30s, had radiators in the bedrooms. They removed them and didn't use anything as a replacement. I guess that's why we usually slept with the door open. I never had a problem with being too cold growing up in the 50s and 60s. The Hydro-thing might not be enough depending on wall and storm window insulation properties and if the door is open or closed. You might try shutting off the valve for a while and see what it's like.
On 11/15/2012 12:05 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

heat it provides, but I don't like so many other things about it: it occupies space under a window, my roomba gets stuck underneath it, it's not particularly beautiful, it collects a lot of dust.

opportunity to equip them with Hydrotherm radiators (2 at 8400 BUT each). We have one in the bathroom and love it. So the plan is to remove the cast iron radiator and replace it with two of these.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I'd build a ventilated box for the existing radiator.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

They even sell such things, metal, with a lid that opens.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi,
In my bedroom I have a conventional hot-water cast iron radiator. I like the heat it provides, but I don't like so many other things about it: it occupies space under a window, my roomba gets stuck underneath it, it's not particularly beautiful, it collects a lot of dust.
I'm currently in the process of designing bedroom cabinets and have an opportunity to equip them with Hydrotherm radiators (2 at 8400 BUT each). We have one in the bathroom and love it. So the plan is to remove the cast iron radiator and replace it with two of these.
However, I am hesitating because it seems like a radical change. Any disadvantages to what I'm planning that I may be missing?
Thank you!
Sam
***********************************************************************
Can't say if the BTU is right or not. Have you calculated what you need? There are charts on the internet that can give you a good approximation of what you have by measuring the radiator and comparing the type of casting, etc. Most radiators were sized to handle the house when it was built, but since then, you may have better inside windows, storm windows, added insulation and better draft control so less heat is needed.
Location is next. Putting the new units in cabinets may not give you the proper output. The best location is usually under a window as it helps stop the cold drafts.
Personally, I like the look and feel of the old cast iron in some locations. They retain heat and help stop fluctuations, but they are also slower to react and can be in the way. Nice place to keep a towel or your socks to put on in the morning. The villa in Italy we've rented a couple of times has them and I warm the bread on them as the oven did not work well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
there are newer thin high efficency radiators that weigh almost nothing, call a HVAC person for more info. The radiators are under the windows for comfort, since thats the greatest heat loss area.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Probably greatly aids convection and heat output.. The possible issues I see are: 1. Capping/plugging the feed and return lines. 2. Somehow disturbing the flow to other radiators.
I like your idea best. I replaced a high old-style round-top that went higher than the kitchen window sill in my old house. A buddy went for new baseboard finned radiators, and gave me one of his more modern low profile flat-top cast iron radiators that was replaced. Had to take out a couple sections to get the length right, and maybe changed a nipple on the feed pipe. No noticeable difference in heat output, but much nicer looking and practical. There are a lot of replacement options, including fan-assist, but be careful about moving it from the window.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wonder if anyone had the fin style steam radiators like I had while growing up in NYC.
They were about the same height and length as standard cast iron steam radiator, but maybe only 4 - 56" deep. They looked similar to this one, but our's were not flush with the wall. The cover went to the wall, i.e. no space behind it, but stood 4 - 5" pround.
I remember my mom putting tin foil loaf pans filled with water on the top flat surface to add humidity to the house.
I also remember how much they'd fill the house with the smell of paint the first few times they came on in the winter if we painted the room earlier that year.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 14 Nov 2012 21:05:11 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

heat it provides, but I don't like so many other things about it: it occupies space under a window, my roomba gets stuck underneath it
This you can correct just by putting a grill between the front legs of the radiator. If there is adequate circulation from the back, and sides you can put a solid piece of wood there.
I finally put a piece of wood along one side of my bed and I no longer lose my shoes or socks. It's wonderful.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.