Relocating a 10' x 12" shed

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Of course, when the shed was built the location that it is in made perfect sense. Now, my wife and I are comtemplating some structural changes to our house and the addition would take advantage of the space where the shed currently sits.
I'm probably going to have to dismantle the shed - which was stick built on site - and try to rebuild it reusing as much if the original materials as possible.
But, everyone in here always has such a wide range of opinions - from highly useful to smart-alecky and hilarious.
So, for the group - If I wanted to try and move this shed, what would my options and some suggestions be? Would it be feasible to rent a fork lift? Can I screw on enough casters to roll it around? Winch it up onto a flat bed wrecker?
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well, how was it built? you could probably just put it on some pvc pipes and push it around the yard. get some local kids to keep moving the rollers from the back to the front. if it was good enough for the egyptians to move the stones for the pyramids, it'll move your shed. of course, the shed would have to have been built to stay in one piece. if not, perhaps you can take it apart and move each wall seperately, then put it back together.
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I'm pretty sure that the PVC pipes would crush instantly.
If I could borrow some thick enough metal/steel/iron pipes that might be an idea....
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Commish wrote:

I saw an inventor/discoverer demonstrate how to move 60-ton concrete blocks without rollers. He had a mess of people lined up on each side of the block, each had a long pole. A log was place along each side of the block to act as a fulcrum.
Each person, at the "heave-ho" command, pulled down on their pole and the block went up. Then each person stepped forward a couple of paces and the block moved backwards. Then the heavers raised their poles and the block went down.
The fulcrum-logs were moved to be alongside the block's new position, the pole-tenders got another grip and the block moved another three feet.
Think of it as being similar to rowing a galley.
Quite impressive, really.
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actually, with the weight spread out on many rollers, they probably wouldn't crush there isn't that much weight concentrated in one place on the shed floor or bottoms of the wall, unless it's a block wall shed.. think thick walled pvc in maybe 2" diameter or larger.
you haven't specified construction materials or type.

youtube video cite? that would be interesting to see. there was that other one that was making the rounds 6 months or so of a guy who demonstrated how to move 60 ton blocks with a few pulleys, ropes, stones, or counterweights.
OP: see about 2:00 into this video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRRDzFROMx0&feature=PlayList&pj7046ADB920C5B6&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index

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charlie wrote:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRRDzFROMx0&feature=PlayList&pj7046ADB920C5B6&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index
 Yeah, you could do that. But the Egyptians didn't know about pulleys or block-and-tackles.
This same guy also elevated giant stones using a similar method. Everybody would heave, the stone would go up and, while it was up, others would shove timbers beneath it. Then while all the heavers rested, their fulcrum/scaffold would be rebuilt a little higher.
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Some inventor/discoverer. Probably just watched a bunch of old B&W holy movies and stole the idea from the Pyramid builders.
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It would be helpful to know a little more about its construction. What does it sit on? Is it anchored to the ground or to some kind of foundation, or does it just sit on the ground? If the latter, you can probably jack or lever it up and move it. I would start with some sort of simple test - take a 2X4 and a cement block and see if you can lift up one corner. If you can get it up off the ground then you could likely go with the rollers or with skids that you slip under there. Is the floor made of plywood on 2X4s? If so it is probably rigid enough to keep the shed together. Another idea would be to install some diagonal bracing inside the shed for the move, then remove it afterward. Also, I would not be so quick to dismiss the PVC idea - especially if the weight is distributed over many contact points (i.e. the PVC pipe is perpendicular to the joists). -- H
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I'm not sure how heavy (or sturdy) your shed is, but when my 10x12 pre- built shed was delivered, two guys used a couple of 6" (I'm guessing) PVC pipes and a cartoonishly large crowbar with wheels to move it around (the crowbar was for getting it on and off of the pipes and final tweaking). Pipe that size probably costs a few bucks, but probably beats the hell ou of taking the whole shed apart... It has a heavy wood floor structure that probably weighs more than the rest of the shed combined.
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The shed itself is fairly sturdy. It was stick-built on site and sits on some 4x4 blocks on a blacktop drive way - so there's a little room underneath all the way around.
So, the walls are built with 2x4 studs covered with T-111 siding. The floor sits on 2x8s (or 2x6s, I haven't scuttle underneath to check it. It's a gambrel roof with asphalt shingles.
So, if I have to - I can take it apart, but it wasn't built to be easily dissembled.
For the folks who suggested rollers - I like that idea, however, where I want it is down a slope. How much slope? My 4yos can sled down it safely, but you have to stop them from the bushes at the bottom. I wouldn't call it steep. But it's a little more than gentle....
Once on the rollers, how likely will it be to take off?
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-snip-

Very! Hard to tell from here but it sounds like you have enough slope to forgo rollers & just use skids. And your challenge is to hold it back-- not pull it forward.
Remember to tie it off up near the eaves and down low- and don't make any sudden moves.
I work alone so the way I do it would be different from the way someone with lots of bodies would do it.
I'd hook a winch on it- get it to the hill- then put the winch on the high side and ease it down the hill.
With 10 people, I'd hand 2 people video cameras, then put 4 people on each side, each with a rope across to the person on the other side. We'd pick up the darn thing and have it down the hill in no time.
Jim
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

I'm getting a picture in my head- a couple 4x4s with rounded ends, tucked under the sides and bolted to the shed somehow. 4x4s longer than the shed, with a couple 2x6 cross pieces at the ends, lagged into the 4x4s. Use a truck or come-along for motive power, and another one or a belay system on the uphill side as a brake. Tow straps, not chain or cable, for the pulling connection.
If you have a couple of buddies with 4x4 trucks, they probably have all the needed bits already. Basically make the shed into a sled.
-- aem sends...
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Commish wrote:

Very.
Stuff weighs more, sometimes MUCH more, going downhill than going up.
I refer you to an old movie: "The Gun." They got it UP the hill okay, but going down it broke loose and cut a swath about fifteen feet wide through a forest.
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Commish wrote:

Round wood fence posts like these. You'd only need 4-6. http://www.kencove.com/fence/Wood+Posts_detail_P4X12PCP.php
--

dadiOH
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I'm pretty sure that the PVC pipes would crush instantly.
If I could borrow some thick enough metal/steel/iron pipes that might be an idea....
Moved my 10x8 shed that way. Use four 3" pipes to move it 10 feet and turn it 90 degrees. Took 30 minutes total.
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I think you should do a bit of research on the compressive strength of a 3 or 4" PVC pipe and compute the total weight of the shed. Then I am fairly sure you will find that 3-5 pipes can handle that weight with no problem.
I can tell you for a fact that a 2 axle dump truck with 7 ton of gravel backed over mine which was only buried 5" deep (gutter drain) and did absolutely no damage.
Colbyt
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Commish wrote:

You still haven't described the construction of the floor. Thats 99% of figuring out if and how it can be moved.
PVC won't crush because the weight is distributed. My cousin had a large prefab shed business and they often needed to move them into final position using that method. If you don't want to tinker with it you could likely pay someone like him a nominal charge to do it when in your neighborhood.
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People move pontoon boats all the time on PVC pipes without any issues. I'm sure a 24' pontoon boat is heaver than a shed.
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On Fri, 17 Jul 2009 08:10:11 -0700 (PDT), Commish
-snip-

i've moved an 8x10 shed twice with a 6' bar, 2 landscape timbers for tracks and a bucket of grease. I used a couple pipes for rollers once, but I work alone so they just slowed me down.
It is a shoddily built thing, built by a previous owner from 2x3's on 2' centers and T-1-11. The first time I moved it there were only 3 sides- the one side was the garage.
To the guy who said PVC would crush--I doubt it. schedule 40 3" pipes is what I rolled my hot tub on. They showed no signs of stress. A stick built shed is probably little more than the weight as all that fiberglass & motors. [and if it is- you're out $5- and a re-think]
In any event- the name of the moving game is "slow, slow, slow". Haste will only wreck the building or crush some flesh. but it is so cool when you've done it. Way better than destruction/construction.
Jim
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When I expanded my back porch I had to move mine. Part of the foundation was a pair of 6x6 timbers running the length of the building and that set on some concrete blocks to level. We set it down on PVC pipe and rolled it about 20ft with it still loadedfor the most part. We did remove items that might get damaged if shaken around. We put 10 rollers under a 10 x 12 building and took the pipe back for a refund after we finished. There may have only been 9 under it at any one time. Four of it pushed it by hand for the most part. There was one place where we got stuck because of a dip in the ground. We got it moving again by using a shovel as an anchor for a come-along. Ground here is very hard clay when it is dry. If you have soft soil you may have to lay down some runners.
Jimmie
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