Refrigirator - runs, stops, does not restart

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Dear Johny, the Fridge Doctor disagres with you.
http://www.fridgedoctor.com/fridge-doctor-book/cabinet-integrity.html Another part that is often deemed unnecessary and in a lot of cases ends up missing, is the cardboard cover over the compressor housing area at the back near the floor that sometimes has insulation attached to it. Over time the attachment holes of the cardboard rip out on one side and because it just a piece of cardboard, many times it is discarded. However, as stated previously, this part has a purpose or it simply would not be there. You can be assured the engineers that designed the refrigerator would not go through the trouble of making the part and getting it attached it to each and every unit on the assembly line if it wasn't there for a reason. In a forced air condenser design, the cardboard deflects the air moved by the fan to cool the compressor then evaporate the condensate water. On static condenser designs, the cardboard ensures the compressor operates at its optimum temperature, directs air flow through the proper channels, and in some cases serves as an acoustic baffle.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Tue, 19 Jul 2005 13:34:50 GMT, "Stormin Mormon"
Let them disagree!
It isn't the first time, and it won't be the last...

LOL!
The air is over the compressor before it bounces off the cardboard "baffle". Many cardboard "baffles" have a large hole cut out, covered by a wire mesh, to allow air to exhaust out the back. Front kick plates serve a similar function, except they are designed more for aesthetics and to take moderate abuse. They are mainly there for "protection" ... protection against liability, for one thing (and from foreign objects being sucked in). But a fixed cardboard cover can only slow airflow down - it can't increase it. One useful function may be to direct some warm air over the drip pan to aid in evaporation, but that's about it. A few models will have a center baffle, especially certain side-by-side models. This may be important, to create an air tunnel. But the rear cover? Never in a million years. It has little to do with airflow, except maybe to aid in evaporation of the condensate drain water.
Many models with static condensers have no rear panel, because there are no moving parts to protect against. These models are also designed with no exposed electrical connections in the rear.
The fridgedoctor guys, among others, must follow protocol, because omitting any safety cover or device opens them up to a host of liability issues.
Although I've yet to be sued after some kid reached in and stuck his hand in the condenser fan...
Like the song says:
"There ain't no good guys, there ain't no bad guys There's only you and me and we just disagree" -Jim Krueger
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-john
wide-open at throttle dot info
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If it was overload, it would be cycling on overload ("short-cycling"). Compressors normally run quite hot. If it runs for a few hours, reaches temperature, then shuts off and stays off, you probably have a bad defrost timer.
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-john
wide-open at throttle dot info
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