Refinishing Wood Furniture


OK, I have a shelf that my dad made a long time ago and I've decided I want to change the stain color. I first tried a stain called PolyShades directly over the old stain and that didn't look good at all. So, I scraped all of the old stain off and started over. We'll, I didn't do a very good job of sanding after I scraped and so when I added my new stain, it didn't look good at all.
My question is, can I just sand over the stain I just applied without having to strip or scrape the stain off? Or do I have to strip it first and then sand again?
Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sanding usually won't work unless you REALLY SAND. Use paint remover. Buy a good brand ... go to a paint store and get their recommendations.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd strip it first and wait a day or so then sand it. Follow the directions on the stripper can. Then try the stain of your choice.
--
"Anybody can have more birthdays, but it takes balls to get old!"

BetsyB
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ronni wrote:

The typical way to finish wood is to put stain IN the wood .. you wipe or brush it on, it sinks into the wood. Then a clear protective coat of varnish or lacquer goes on to keep anything else from soaking into the wood. So, if you want the wood a different color, you need to strip or sand off both the clear coat and the stain. Only way to get all of the stain out is to sand it away. Stripper will remove the clear coat and most of the stain. When you sanded, it sounds like you still had some clear coat on part of the wood, which would keep the second stain from soaking in evenly. If you do a hack job of sanding, you are likely to ruin the shelf. Safer to get some stripper, follow the label instructions to remove the old finish. Try to find out what kind of wood you are working with, as soft wood will soak in more stain than harder woods. Plain oak or maple might be beautiful without stain, and just a clear coat. Good luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is this just a simple shelf, or something more complicated?
If the first, I wonder if it is worth the effort this would take. If the second, it is worth it more, but will also take even more effort.
Maybe painting it would be compromise idea. Perhaps some shade of brown.
I have a stepstool my grampa made. It was wider than the legs and if you stood outside the legs, it would tip over. I used it like that for years, but eventually decided to fix it and kept cutting parts off the ends. It still isn't perfect but would look funny if I cut off any more. So I've gone back to trying to make sure I stand in the middle. Fortunately it was already painted glossy white, so I don't have the issue you have.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Use a good quality stripper (Zip Strip) brush it on thick, but do not over brush too much. Let it sit for 10 minutes or so and keep any drying areas wet with more stripper. Scrap off the finish and stripper with a putty knife and buff right away with the grain with #2 or 3 steel wool until you start getting dust. If any finish is left repeat the steps again. Use a rag and apply some laquer thinner on the wood and buff again with the steel wool until you get dust again. Sand the wood until the color is consistant. Use 120 grit and finish with 220 grit. Apply stain as desired, let dry and spray with a can of laquer thinner. It will take several coats to get a great finish, sand lightly between coats with 220 or finer. After finish coat buff with 000 steel wool and add a coat of wax (not Pledge type stuff, but real furniture wax or carnuba). Good luck, as this is a more time consuming way, but the results will last for many years and it is done right.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for all your replies!
Actually there is no clear coat or anything, its only the stain that I have added. The reason the sanding doesn't look good is because i went against the grain and it made scratches in the wood. I couldn't see the scratches until I added the stain and now the scrates are darker than everything else.
Also there are two peices of the shelf made out of a different kind of wood than the rest of the shelf and the stain looks much, much darker on those peices, what should I do about that? I've heard that a wood conditioner might help? Anyone know about wood conditioners?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Can you post a picture on the internet or email me one? Most sanding with the grain can get the scratches out. It will take a bit of elbow grease however. A darker stain can make the differnet woods match ok and you and more stain after the first coat dries and make the lighter woods darker. You can also add color in between coats of lacquer, but only if you are spraying on the finish.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.