Questions on seamless gutters

Hello,
I need to replace my gutters and am considering whether to use a seamless gutter outfit that shapes aluminum roll stock on site. So a couple questions:
I assume that where the gutter turns a shallow angle (e.g. 22.5 degrees for a bay), a seam would be required anyway. Or is there some way to extrude the angle, too?
On a long straight run with downspouts at either end, the middle should be high with slope down towards each downspout. Does this require a seam in the middle, or is the extruded gutter flexible enough to accomodate the change in slope without a seam?
Thanks, Wayne
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I installed my own last year, had them dropped off on site. There are various thickness available, availabliity may vary by area. The Home Depot 10' gutters are .019" thick. The common seamless gutters are .025" and came in various colors. The 'commercial' version is .032" thick and came only in white. I have large trees that drop branches, so I went with the .032".

It needs a joint. There are two types. mitered and <mumble>. One type is the standard, 6" long, pre-formed corners you can buy anywhere, the mitered joint is a small strip that goes inside and your miter cut (plus the rivets or screws) is the only thing showing. I only needed 90 degree corners.

Hmm, dunno. My longest run was 36', and I designed it for one outlet which works fine. They are pretty stiff when installed, they certainly wouldn't drop at each end very much without a relief cut or a kink in the center, I would think.
--
Dennis


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The change in slope is really quite minor. The seamless gutters are plenty flexible to accommodate the change. I think, and someone SHOULD correct me if I am wrong, but I think that a slop of around 1/2" per 10' is plenty for gutters.
JK
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I'm not in the gutter business, so take this free advice for what it cost you. I had seamless gutters installed all around the house right after it was built ten years ago. At every angle there had to be a seam.
As far as slope on a long run, I'm not sure that is really needed, as long as there is no low spot. Any small amount of residual water will soon dry after a rain.
One word of caution is that the gutter should be installed so there is a slight air space behind it, between the fascia and the gutter. This should be about half an inch.
The reason I mention this is that I had fascia board rotting in four different areas around the house. I noticed that above each of these rotted areas, the gutter was tight against the fascia and where there was space, there was no rot.
In sighting down the gutter from one end, I noticed that the nails (screws) were not driven in at right angles to the fascia. That is, they were slanting upward which held the gutter against the board. As a result, no air could get behind them to allow for drying.
I fixed this by bending the those nails upward to pull the bottom of the gutter away from the house.
Hope this helps in some way.
Bob-tx
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Do you mean there should be a gap at the bottom of the gutter, while the top is tight to the fascia?
Thanks, Wayne
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wrote:

it. At any rate, where the gutter was tight against the wood on the bottom, is where it rotted. Bob-tx
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Mine created a long popsicle for most of the winter that kept the eave, eventually rotting it. The gutter had been mounted in contact with the eave. (fascia?)
Steve
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