Question about fill compaction under slab. (A request for help)

I've had a 30'x40'x6" turned-down slab with 8" footers poured for a pole barn/work shop that I'm building. The concrete used was 3600psi, fiber re-enforced, with wire and a relief keyway every 10 feet. I basically left all the details of the slab work in the hands of the concrete contractor (not knowing anything about concrete work myself.) I naively assumed that I could get the slab poured and get to work on my shop before starting the permitting process. Let me say that I know this was a big mistake and of course the WRONG WAY to go about things, but I live in a very rural area and got this impression from talking to others in the area, the concrete contractor included.
When I started the permitting process, the inspector begrudgingly let me go ahead with the project, but would not sign off on the slab work until I had some soil compaction testing done on the fill that had been put down. When I got word back from the soil engineer after the testing, he said that it tests to "3", where it should have been in the teens (Sorry, I don't know the units off-hand. Suffice it to say, it's at most a quarter of what it needs to be.)
According to the soil engineer, the choices are 1) tear it up and start over or 2) install piers every 5 feet or so on the sides that have the deepest fill (about 5' deep). Based on the discussion we had, it sounds like the installation of piers will cost somewhere around what it cost to pour the slab in the first place.
I haven't talked to the concrete contractor or the county inspector since learning about this problem. I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on how to proceed with the least pain and/or expense. The inspector seems to be somewhat of a good 'ol boy who is willing to waive his hand just a little to help me out, but I suspect that that won't be the case this time. Any help appreciated. At the very least, I hope I gave everyone a good laugh!
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gai Sum wrote:

Seems (to me) you have a lot of fill. If it wasn't compacted properly the slab is going to break up anyway, might as well replace it if fixing costs as much.
-- dadiOH _____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.0... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico ____________________________
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
How about those guys who can blow in concrete under a sinking footer?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gai Sum wrote:

I'm sorry to say, this is one of those situations where the local Bubas think they know better than the building inspector. The building inspector and local codes are there to protect you from things like this, but I guess you know this now.
Don't make matters worse now by listening to any of the Bubas who got you into it. It really needs to be made right, even if it needs to be totally replaced. I suggest you have a nice long talk with the concrete contractor who seems to have told you that you did not need to get the testing done. He is suppose to be a professional and in this case he failed. He may be responsible for some of all of the repair cost. See an attorney.
Good Luck
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gai Sum wrote:

Is the modification needed to support the slab, something on the slab, or to support the building? If the latter, can you just drill your poles an extra 3-5' down, and ignore the concrete entirely?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.