Quake proofing old house on stilts?

This is an over 80 year old house near the sea, so the nails will be getting a bit weak. It is built on stilts 5 to 7 feet tall, with mainly vertical outer covering for this `basement'. The basement has hardly any internal walls, except some flimsy rooms at one end. It has a few diagonal wooden steadiers at teh other end.
We do get some quakes here and once the steeple top was knocked off our 200 ft cathedral. Quite a bit of quake restance strengthening has been going on in big old buildings. New big ones tend to be built on rubber and lead `base isolators'?
A diagonal wooden strut will bend a bit under compression and allow some flexibilty one way, but will not stretch. I suppose quake forced oscillation will work with the strut straight as one maximum. Is it better to preserve some flexibility by having all the diagonal struts parallel?
The house has a brick chimney, too, and is on sand.
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Yes, I was thinking of advances in thinking.
If I had wanted a large building before the days of base isolators being generally known an engineer would not have told me.
I read that houses supported on tall piles on hillsides are susceptible to earthquake damage?
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