preventing water from wicking up bottom of fence boards?

I noticed newly installed fence board have wet bottoms after raining. I think water is wicking up from the bottom of the fence board.
Would painting just the bottom (the side that faces the ground) of the fence board (a 4x1 cedar) fix this and prolong the life of the fence? Since it's impossible to repaint the bottom once the fence is installed, whatever paint/stain/sealant is used should last 10 years or more in an outdoor environment. Any suggestions?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Remove the bottom board or let it be, nothing you can do to stop it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
peter wrote:

1. Saw sufficient inches from the bottom to prevent the pickets from touching the ground.
2. If number 1 looks odd, cover the resulting space with horizontal boards. When they rot, replace.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Never have wood in contact with the ground. If the wood is wet, it is likely to get termites. If the fence contacts the house, termites can infest the house that way. Even treated wood can be infested after about 10 years.
Stretch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

normal.............It's not good, whether it's normal or not, if the fence boards touch the ground, moisture will fairly quickly cause the fence boards to rot at the bottom.
I also recommend that the bottom of the fence be made of a sacrificial, horizontally mounted board, just above the ground. Not touching the ground.
I have no pets, and don' plan on it, so I made my fence sit just high enough I can slide my foot under it about halfway ( with shoe on ). This helps with using the weed whacker thing and not chewing the fence up also.
It's also a good plan, if keeping pets in to build a concrete curb with the fence posts in it to help keep the critters from digging under easily, and this keeps the water from becoming a problem too.
Lots of thought goes into putting up a solid, proper fence for whatever application.
As another reply suggested, I'd recommend cutting the bottom off a little and putting in that treated lumber bottom piece horizontally.
Remove "YOURPANTIES" to reply
MUADIB
http://www.angelfire.com/retro/ssterile/MAIN%20PAGE.html
one small step for man,..... One giant leap for attorneys.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Would painting just the bottom (the side that faces the ground) of the fence board (a 4x1 cedar) fix this and prolong the life of the fence?"
Yes, that's always good practice and will help prevent premature rot. Also make sure the bottom of the wood is not touching the ground. You could use a urethane type of sealer for even better protection.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Use either plastic fencing materials in the future. I suppose if you had put 3 coats of oil based varnish on the boards when they were new, then that would probably also work, but I don't see anyone doing that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24 Mar 2005 06:30:50 -0800, scott snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com scribbled this interesting note:

Even that plastic will become brittle and crack and/or shatter under impact (from things such as soccer balls, baseballs, hail stones, etc.) I'd rather take the time to properly design and build a good wood fence out of good materials. It will take some maintenance eventually, but the parts are easy to find and replace.
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

or more in an >>outdoor environment. Any suggestions?
Under those conditions you won't find anything that lasts 10 years. Wood expands and contracts with changes in weather, eventually leaving whatever you paint on the bottom with cracks. Even a stain that absorbs won't last 10 years.
I agree with all the suggestions that say make sure the wood is not in contact with the ground. And I'd make sure to keep vegetation trimmed so it's not in contact with the wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Pete,
You don't say that the bottoms are actually in contact with the ground. If the fence is professionally installed I doubt that would be the case. Could what you are observing simply be that the rain water run down the fence, allowing the top of the fence to dry while the bottom, which is now wetter, hasn't. Sort of like when you hang something on the cloths-line - the top of the item gets dry while the bottom takes longer?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.