Painting Pressure Treated Lumber

How does Pressure Treated Lumber Paint? Does it hold primer. I'm thinking about using it as trim pieces that need to be replaced due to termite and dry rot damage. I'm a little worried about the warp factor too.
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evodawg wrote:

I've redone a few dry rotted window sills with it. No problem with paint.
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Make CERTAIN that it is TOTALLY dry!
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1D10T wrote:

for paint reasons or warping???
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evodawg wrote:

...
http://www.southernpine.com/ptsealers.shtml http://www.southernpine.com/expert/index.pl?leafcode0
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Ditto!
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Some lumber yards carry a treated pine (some lightweight, fast growing, low strength species). It is shipped wet, but even when dried out, the crap won't hold a paint finish or glue, based on my experience. Haven't seen any KD versions of the stuff. probably because it would warp dramatically in the oven. Treated Southern yellow pine rules so far as being sturdy and paintable. Did some basement stairs a while back, and painted with ordinary oil based polyurethane porch and floor paint, no primer. Still looks just fine.
Joe
Joe
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All the pressure treated wood I've used lately has been very wet. When I built a deck last summer, every screw squeezed out a little puddle. The data sheets from the manufacturer all have said to wait at least three months before finishing. Others have recommended using a moisture meter, and I agree.
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PT expands and contracts a LOT.
your far better off staining it.
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bob haller wrote:

Think I'm going to use cedar. Sounds like PT is way to much trouble and will have to wait to long to paint. Thanks to all that had a lot to do with changing my mind for the better.
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Use pressure-treated wood for the hidden support structure (posts and joists) in any case. Cedar isn't all that much better than anything else if you let it touch the ground.
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You need around under 15% moisture to be able to paint, pressure treat is soaked under pressure and might take 6 months to dry or paint will peel. Get a inexpensive moisture meter to test before you paint. I would talk to the co that treated the wood and people at a true paint store not HD types or call a paint manufacturers tech support. Ive always stained PT, stains breathe more than paint. If it is not fully cured through paints wont last and it possible with the new PT treatment you cant paint. New PT also can eat metal,untreated nails wont work, and Galvanising has to be an approved type coating, I forgot which treatment is Ng. Stainless is fine. Its alot of trouble for some trim work, why not cedar.
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