Painting exterior stucco spray or roll?

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I have a single story ranch style home that was built in the mid 1950's.
The exterior is stucco and I am getting proposals on getting it painted. One of the beter painters in the area tells me that he sprays with a good tip and another person is right behind him to backroll. He says he can roll but it will take alot longer. He says that the spray / backroll yields good results.
Another painter tells me that he only rolls and that it is better.
Is there much of a difference?
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Spray is quicker and easier just be sure of no wind and he has liability ins, with a 2 mph wind I once got paint on a car 50 ft away. He who sprays makes alot of money that day! Both ways are fine, things have to be covered
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Here's an answer from a desert rat that lived in Las Vegas for fifty years.
Spraying paint on stucco gives you better penetration and coverage into all the crevices, as stucco is a very uneven surface. Some say you don't have to backroll if you just spray thick, but someone who offers to backroll obviously knows what they are doing and willing to take the extra time. Backrolling also eliminates a lot of overlap lines that are visible on the dried painted surface. There is no comparison between spraying and rolling, except spraying will probably use more paint, but what's wrong with that? No matter what you do, you will not get down into all the crevices with a roller unless you load your roller with about a gallon of paint each time, and you'll lose half of that to gravity and centrifugal spin of the roller. Do the spray. If you really want to go better from there, check out the elastomeric stucco paints, but they take a heavier sprayer. These will flex and not show the small cracks associated with stucco aging.
Just MHO, what do I know?
Steve
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Painting stucco is like painting a cement sponge. Which is why it holds moisture and the paint doesn't last.
Very simple.
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do not paint stucco. PERIOD. if you ever do ( with eg. latex exterior paint) breathing ability of stucco will be impaired /suppressed and you will het mold/fungus/dry rot in between stucco and the wall
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do not paint stucco. PERIOD. if you ever do ( with eg. latex exterior paint) breathing ability of stucco will be impaired /suppressed and you will het mold/fungus/dry rot in between stucco and the wall
=================================================== Preaching to the choir. To be honest. I never really knew why. All I remember is the stucco houses that had been paint usually didn't hold up well. After some Usenet kooks started to flame me, I looked into it and now it makes perfect sense. It's like painting a sponge. Any water that gets in, and it will, soaks the sponge causing the paint to peel. Also, potentially causing damage to the sub-wall because the paint won't allow the stucco to dry out like it's supposed to after a rain. Anybody that was seen a dark stucco house after a rain would know what I'm talking about. The walls are soaking wet and have to dry out.
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What is your definition of "long"?
I have a room that was added on 12 yrs ago, which is stuccoed and the original paint still looks fine.
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wrote:

What is your definition of "long"?
I have a room that was added on 12 yrs ago, which is stuccoed and the original paint still looks fine. ==================================================Hey Ron.
Look above at my response above and these links. I'm tired of bickering. I just know I'm somewhat correct from seeing 1000's of stucco houses in Central and Southern NM and observing them for several years.
Most educated people, where I lived, knew not to paint stucco. Don't get riled. Look at the links and then make a decision for yourself.
http://www.bobvila.com/HowTo_Library/Refinishing_Stucco-Stucco_Walls-A2557.html
http://www.lime.org/BLG/Mold.pdf
http://www.chicagostucco.com/faq.html
Be cool!
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Well, I don't know what to say. All I know is, I have a room that was added on 12 yrs ago, stuccoed and painted and it still looks fine.
And, the front of my home is also painted stucco and the original paint (over 20 yrs old) was fine when I repainted my home 2 yrs ago. (paint on block was peeling)
I'm in Florida so maybe that's why I'm not having any problems.
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wrote:

Well, I don't know what to say. All I know is, I have a room that was added on 12 yrs ago, stuccoed and painted and it still looks fine.
And, the front of my home is also painted stucco and the original paint (over 20 yrs old) was fine when I repainted my home 2 yrs ago. (paint on block was peeling)
I'm in Florida so maybe that's why I'm not having any problems.
===========================================My biggest concern would be water. The house I'm in now has eaves all he way around it so the walls stay pretty dry.
Almost all the stucco houses in NM have no eaves (flat roofs) and the walls get soaked. Probably why painting them is such a bad I idea.
Once you've painted stucco you're pretty much stuck with painting. So a stucco recoat would be out of the question.
If your walls are getting wet, I'd suspect you're going to have problems eventually with mold and paint peeling. If you have eaves, and the walls stay *dryer*, probably not as much.
Any case good luck. and thanks for being civil.
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Billy Pilgrim wrote:

Flat roofs? Could you possibly be talking about adobe houses plastered with adobe (mud)? If so, please note that adobe and stucco (portland base) are *not* the same thing.
--

dadiOH
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you are absolutley right. I'm talking about your standard stucco house with a flat roof.
here is a typical one:
http://www.drewowensllc.com/html/tierra_madre_rd_.html
this is right down the road from where I lived in Abq.
Beautiful...
You can bet this house will never be painted. :)
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Billy Pilgrim wrote:

I wouldn't paint mud either. Stucco, yes; mud, no.
--

dadiOH
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Billy Pilgrim wrote:

I wouldn't paint mud either. Stucco, yes; mud, no.
--

dadiOH
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Then take it up with these guys.
http://www.bobvila.com/HowTo_Library/Refinishing_Stucco-Stucco_Walls-A2557.html http://www.lime.org/BLG/Mold.pdf http://www.chicagostucco.com/faq.htmlmaybe someone here will argue with you. you certainly have plenty of dittoheads that will agree.i'll go with common sense and past experience.
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I'm not sure why but my response to you are not posting correctly.
Must be something to do with the packets and the ISPs
anyway, I just posted all the old links and I'd be interested in your rebuttal to them.
I have nothing more to say.
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Billy Pilgrim wrote:

OK. I moved them here...

He is citing someone that says it encourages dry rot. There is nothing to rot on a masonry house.

What about it? The author is explaining lime wash. If someone wants to use it that is fine with me.

He is a contractor peddling something; namely..."We use an acrylic, water repellant coating product that is made specifically for cement." IOW, acrylic "varnish".
If he put color in his "acrylic, water repellant coating product" he would have a transparent, colored coating. If he put in something opaque too he would have paint. __________________

Promise?
--

dadiOH
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when you reccomend painting, do you ask if the house is a masonary house?

It also expalins the difficulties of working with stucco that has been painted. Common problem when people want to get the job done right.

You missed this page
http://www.chicagostucco.com/recoat.html

Only in regards to your rebuttals
BTW: I found these websites in a matter of minutes. There is an overwhelming amount of information with regards to stucco.
Just think of it this way. Stucco soaks up water. When the stucco gets wet it becomes very hard for the paint to adhere.
Of course there are all the other reasons but I grow tired of going over and over them. I'm not being rude it's just the truth.
You really don't seem like that bad of a guy. There were a couple of flamers that got involved in this and you stepped in it.
Really, if you feel you are right fine. But be aware, there is another side to the story when you give advice. I lived in NM for 40+ years. I've seen 1000 upon 1000 of stucco houses. I've seen them painted and recoated. Recoated ALWAYS looks better and is more professional looking.
Sorry. That's just the way it is. Nothing you say is going to change that.
:-)
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Billy Pilgrim wrote:

Don't give up now, Billy Boy...you are on the verge of becoming a HERO! Continue your crusade...convince the millions of US homeowners that live in CB houses covered with painted stucco that they screwed up big time...educate the builders that are churning out this stupidity even as we speak. (Maybe talk to a lawyer about a class action suit against the builders. Toss in the building departments that permit this perfidy too).
And when you finish the US, learn Spanish and carry your crusade to Mexico, Central America and South of America where there are 10s of millions more - virtually ALL houses - of those painted abominations . By the time you finish there, China will be rich enough to have started stuccoing and will have painted THEIR houses and buildings so study Mandarin at night while you are saving the Hispanic world.
No, don't stop, continue - you have found your life's work. Once you become an adult.
--

dadiOH
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Egads! Writing in with some questions is like writing in and asking what the weather is going to be like tomorrow.
Well, it depends on where you live, doesn't it?
I would think the same would apply to the stucco/paint controversy.
I can see that in SOME places, the stucco would not dry out in a short enough time to prevent mold. I can see in SOME places, it would NEVER dry out, so it isn't even used in that part of the country. And I did see in SOME places where it dried out an hour after a rain, or at least within a day. And for a long time, it BAKED AND BAKED AND BAKED in the sun until the next year when the yearly rain came.
So, who's answer is right? I think the best thing to do is investigate the local practices. What works in Las Vegas, Nevada might not work in Las Vegas, New Mexico.
Nobody's right, nobody's wrong.
Now, do you think it will rain tomorrow?
Steve
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