Painted Radiator

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trader_4 wrote:

Just what kind of double-line-spacing google-grouping fool are you?
Of course there is "convective heat transfer", but convection itself is not the mechanism how or reason why a radiator transfers heat to the air surrounding it.
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On Sunday, May 25, 2014 10:15:06 AM UTC-4, HomeGuy wrote:

You really are the village idiot. Of course convection is the primary mode of heat transfer with a radiator. The air gets heated, becomes less d ense, rises and transfers the heat into the room. Just how dumb are you?
http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/thermalP/Lesson-1/Methods-of-Heat-Tra nsfer
"Heat Transfer by Convection
The model used for explaining heat transfer through the bulk of liquids and gases involves convection. Convection is the process of heat transfer from one location to the next by the movement of fluids. The moving fluid carri es energy with it. The fluid flows from a high temperature location to a lo w temperature location."
Read and at least try to learn.
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Wrongo Dumbo. Try re-reading Heat Transer 101. Convection is a mechanism, like radiance, for heat xfer. It is not in and of itself heat xfer.
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On Sunday, May 25, 2014 11:20:11 AM UTC-4, Zaky Waky wrote:

Read what I posed in context. That is what I said:
"Of course convection is heat transfer. When the warmed fluid moves, it transfers heat with it. "
If you want to quibble, then change it to "Of course convection is one mechanism of heat transfer. When the warmed fluid moves, it transfers heat with it".
Happy now?
What Homelessguy is claiming is this:
"Of course there is "convective heat transfer", but convection itself is not the mechanism how or reason why a radiator transfers heat to the air surrounding it. "
That's BS because convection is the dominant process by which the radiator transfers heat to the air in the room. How does the air 8ft away get heated, if not by convection? It's not radiated and it's not conducted. Convection *is* the process that's tranfering the heat. Good grief.
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On Mon, 26 May 2014 19:37:42 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Thank you.
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On Sun, 25 May 2014 05:22:31 +0200, nestork

LIke someone said, this is Usenet (real newsgroups, not what Yahoo or google also callgroups) , and it's not the web. You are using a web-based interface. If you posted, you can't change it.

It's not the dial up that's the problem. In fact if you pay by the minute and it becomes expensive, (everyone is better off using a real news reader, like the one that comes with Thunderbird iirc, or Outlook Express, or Agent (though new versions of Agent are no longer free) then you more than others would benefit, because the ones I mentioned are what are called off-line readers. You can download 100 or 1000 posts, both headers and bodies, in, say, alt.home.repair, and then you can hang up the phone, read all the bodies, answer the ones you want and then call up again and post all your answers in a minute or 3. You don't have to pay for the time you're reading, thinking, or typing.

The technicians might care only about rate, but plainly the science cares about more than rate.

I don't think this is a good analogy, at least not for me. We do live in a Newtonian world and the soot doesn't bounce off because it's sticky.

That part is true, but with a radiator, the oxygen and nitrogen don't get stuck to the steel. They bounce off.

The energy transfer is because of collision. Now is collision more like conduction or convection or have you come up with a 4th kind of heat transfer?

I'm not claiming that, but since the topic is raise, why is there more deposited soot above drywall nails, and above studs?

This is a red herring afaic. I don't think the soot deposits have anythying to do with water or condensation, although I admit I haven't considered that possibility. And I had a few months when my oil furnace was't adjusted right, so I did have the soot in question, mostly above studs and ceiling 2x4s** and especially above drywall nails. I thought it had to with electrostatic charge, though what would charge the drywall nails I have no idea.
**What are those called? Joists, even though there is no floor above them? .

You're thinking too much about surface tension. The water would stick to the wall and evaporate, so the surface and the surface tension would be gone. And the water. All that would be left is the soot.

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On Thu, 22 May 2014 11:56:34 -0500, Vic Smith

This^. I've yet to see a rad that had so much paint on it that it didn't get hot as a pistol. If you're concerned, give it a good sanding then paint. You'll want to do that antway to make the surface as smooth as possible and add some tooth so the new coat adheres well.
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