Paint/primer combined

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You guys trust the combined paint/primer (I am thinking mainly of the Behr stuff advertised by the BORG, but maybe there are others)? I have about 1500 sq of newly drywalled wall space to paint. It's probably going to take a day or two to do each coat (a lot of angles and cathedral ceiling), so missing a step (assuming I would use two coats of paint whether or not I prime first) would be huge. Maybe I'm being too skeptical, but I am nervous about putting this stuff straight on drywall. If it doesn't go on well or starts to peel in a few years, I will never live it down. That's why I'm looking for thoughts/experiences from this group.
TIA Cub
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I'm very skeptical on that stuff too. And that's putting it over already painted surface! I just finished repainting a couple of rooms. I figure I'm gonna put two coats on for true color and coverage anyway so why spend extra bucks.
On new drywall, I wouldn't trust it unless it got rave reviews from real bonified users. Anyway, you can usually tint drywall primer. Have it tinted 1/2-3/4 of the final color. Not sure if Borg can handle that but a paint store can easily.
I had to do a very large kitchen/dining room once with very high cathedral ceiling walls multiple coats. I used one of these and it was kick-ass. It was called Roll-Fast then I think. No up & down ladders except to move them.
http://www.wagnerspraytech.com/portal/power_roller_max_spray,309017,747.html
Also used it to do ALL the popcorn ceilings in a house. Kick-ass again.
Not good just to do a normal room IMO. You do have to flush it out via a garden hose connection. Keep that in mind if you're in a cold area when you do it. The roller covers for it run $5-10. As far as stopping overnight or between coats, I basically wrapped the roller cover with plastic wrap and left everything in tact paint can and all.
Here's a pretty good summary from someone:
Overall Rating: 3 out of 5 3 out of 5 Better for medium/large jobs, October 12, 2010 By JerryY from Dallas, TX "I bought this unit to paint the interior of my house (2600 sqft w/ 10' ceilings) and it is a bit of a one trick pony.
Basically you put your 1 gallon paint bucket into the strap and attach a lid with a hole for a plastic tube which goes down into the paint. When the button is pressed on the handle of the roller it will pump the paint from the can through all the hose to the roller. I recommend slowly rolling the wall at a slight angle while the roller loads up with paint so the roller is coated evenly. Like I said in my title this is best for big jobs and here's why. As I mentioned in the operation it requires a 1 gallon can and quite a bit of paint is going to be in the hose. So unless you plan to use at least a gallon you're going to flush a ton of paint out of this unit when you clean it. Plus you have to clean it between colors which means if you have a lot of colors you are painting you need to plan accordingly or spend a lot of time cleaning and wasting paint. Also this requires special rollers (they have holes to allow the paint to soak into the roller from the inside out) which are pricier than a standard roller. Clean-up is a messy process too. you have to clean the paint from the tube, the tubing, the roller handle, etc. The ability to run water from the hose through this unit is handy but if you don't have some way to collect the paint you'll be coloring the grass or concrete. My rule of thumb is I only use this roller if I'm using at least a gallon of paint and only have to clean up once. Otherwise, I get the normal trays and rollers out and use those. Don't get me wrong, this isn't a bad product but it will cost you more time and $$$ than it saves in cases where you have multiple colors and/or small areas to paint."
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On 11/9/2010 10:38 AM Red Green spake thus:

Home Despot can and will tint primer. I've had it done there, as well as elsewhere. All you need to do is choose any paint chip from their selection and hand it to them.
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That tinted primer is a great thing. It acts like an additional coat of paint, so it's easier covering up old paint when going from a dark to a light (or vice versa).
--
Tegger

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On 11/9/2010 2:21 PM Tegger spake thus:

Yep, absolutely. As a handyman who doesn't know what color paint I'll be asked to paint or paint over, I keep both untinted white primer and a medium gray primer which works well over and under most colors.
Forgot to mention that no stores I've been in charge for tinting primer.
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Thanks for everyone's advice. I conclude -
Don't use the primer/paint stuff Do use proper primer but get it tinted (I hope they can do that for the 5 gallon drums)
thanks again everyone.
Cub
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On 11/9/2010 4:49 PM cubby spake thus:

Interesting point. I've never bought 5 gallons of paint, but I ass-u-me it comes in custom colors, so they must be able to tint it, right?
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Our local paint store does it in 5 gallon pails. We bought about 25 pails of it last year.
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Dammit David! STFU. Don't give em any ideas
:-)
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It acts like a coat of paint...umm, okay. But it's not. Primer doesn't have all of the expensive stuff in paint - the stuff that makes it durable and washable with good hiding ability. It kills me when people skimp on paint cost when it's such a small part of the overall job. People that tint primer frequently only apply one coat of paint. That's not nearly the same thing as having two coats of paint. The buildup thickness is not the same and the paint job will not wear as well. On some things that might matter, but on other things it definitely does. If you see someone tint primer when they're painting new siding, be very afraid.
R
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On 11/9/2010 6:03 PM RicodJour spake thus:

I don't know about that.
Point about skimping on paint well taken. However, even if applying multiple coats, it's still a good idea to tint just to make it easier to cover a large color difference. After all, why use more paint than necessary?
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Unless someone is using crap paint, two coats of paint will cover just about anything. I've seen crap paint applied in three coats and you could still see the taped joints. I've never seen any color change that wasn't covered with primer and two coats. Since we're talking about tinting primer, that can only mean omitting the second coat of paint.
The only reason people tint primer is to get a little bit of an edge. The edge may be skipping the second coat of paint, or it might be making the little holidays in the first coat disappear. Either way, they're tinting to save time or money, and it's usually at the expense of complete coverage and/or a long-lasting paint job.
When you say "why use more paint than necessary?" it's kind of off point. Of course you shouldn't use more paint than is necessary, but what constitutes necessary? Is it how it looks or how it wears? The limiting factor may be purely a cosmetic issue immediately (right at the time the last coat dries), but more likely, and preferably, the limiting factor should be a certain finish thickness which will determine the longevity of the paint job. In high quality paint the finish thickness is specified. This becomes particularly important when the job is sprayed as some paint jockeys thin the paint to extend it and make it easier to spray fast, so the coverage and buildup take a hit. Two thinned coats might not provide sufficient buildup. Those guys have no choice but to tint the primer.
R
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If you bid or pay for a one coat job then tinting primer can be necessary to do it one coat paint. Few are willing to pay for a second coat. you tint primer so you dont screw yourself into unnecessary work. Thats the way its always been back to 12845 BC when cavemen were hired to paint caves for the cave king.
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Guess it was known as Bear paint back then.
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wrote:>>

No, but look at it this way: If I (a decided non-pro, like most homeowners) need to use primer anyway, and I'm going from a light to a dark, I can use the primer coat to get a little further along in covering up the original light color than I would if I used untinted primer and two coats of paint.
In other words, I'm still applying three coats in total, but with tinted primer I can get the color-hiding effects of four coats (one of primer and three of paint) while still only applying three coats.
In still other words, if primer can be tinted, it's slightly foolish to turn what could be a double-duty coat into a single-duty coat, when double- duty has no downside and plenty of upside.
Now if you wanted to use tinted primer to /cheat/, then that's a whole other ballgame.
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I can't argue with any of that. I really can't argue with whatever someone wants to do on their own house, either. I just wanted to make it clear that tinted primer is not a color coat replacement.
R
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I wholly agree.
It is not a cheat or a shortcut, but an enhancement to what you would have done had the primer not been tinted.
--
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thanks for the tip - I have one of these already, but don't tend to use it unless it's a job I can do in one go (rather than a couple of hours here and there) because of the cleaning. I will try to do this one in one very long day...
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Again, I had absolutely no problem covering the roller/head with plastic food wrap for a night or two. Hell, with latex paint, I've had brushes covered for days in the frig. Not suggesting putting the power roller in the frig!
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I dont think one coat of anything is possible to get a good finish on compound and drywall, if it works im amazed. For exterior I would not use it, not will I use a latex primer outside, the point of primer outside is to penetrate and bond, latex cant penetrate as deep as oil, its the size of the molecules in latex they are bigger.
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