Outlets with wall switches

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One of the outlets in my bedroom has the top outlet connected to a wall switch and the bottom outlet is not. I noticed that some electronic equipment (like TVs) aren't supposed to be plugged into an outlet connected to a wall switch. Why is that? And is it ok to plug TVs/electronics into the bottom outlet that isn't connected to a wall switch?
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Typically the switches are to control table lamps in rooms that don't have ceiling fixtures. Electronics such as TVs, stereos, cable boxes, etc. often never really turn off but only "stand by" and if left unpowered for long periods of time can lose memory like station presets etc. and then you'll have a long wait after turning them back before you can view/hear whatever it was that you were looking for.
There's absolutely no problem plugging anything into a recep that is always hot, even if it is in the same frame as one that is switched. Although as with any electronics a surge protector is not a bad idea (use a surge strip for interconnected devices like stereo components and/or TVs and cable boxes so that they are all plugged into the same circuit; ones with built in antenna/cable surge suppression are good for A/V gear)
good luck
nate
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Jo wrote:

Actually you SHOULD plug them into a switched outlet. They you can REALLY shut them off. All our 'vampire' devices are always really on even though they say off. It's a waste of power.
--
LSMFT

Simple job, assist the assistant of the physicist.
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LSMFT wrote:

Money-saving tips: * Unplug clocks when not in use * Disconnect garage door opener after leaving garage; reconnect on return.
There's bound to be a web site somewhere with more tips.
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Remove lightbulb when leaving room. Take it to the next room.
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On Nov 22, 3:45pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

re: "Remove lightbulb when leaving room. Take it to the next room"
..or like this guy does, "Remove *room* when leaving room."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lg9qnWg9kak

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Cindy Hamilton
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wrote:

There's a circuit board in the GDO waiting to hear from the remote.
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On 11/23/2010 12:18 PM DerbyDad03 spake thus:

But as usual "Bub" was just yanking our chains.
"Unplug clocks when not in use"? Think about it a couple seconds ...
--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
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re: "But as usual "Bub" was just yanking our chains."
I understood exactly who was yanking what, but that doesn't change the fact that unplugging both clocks and GDO's will save electricity.
I'm sure Cindy was also well aware of the yanking being done, but her question was still valid - as was my answer.
P.S. All chain yanks aside, the unplugging of clocks is not as far fetched as it seems. Many modern clocks automatically set themselves as soon as they are plugged in. My daughter has a clock radio that does that. No one could argue that it wouldn't save electricity if she unplugged it when leaving her room in the morning and it wouldn't much of an inconvenience since she'd know the correct time within a few seconds of plugging it back in.
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Sure, they're a waste of power. No argument.
However, I wonder if anyone has performed this study:
In my house, most of the "always on" devices are not plugged into switched outlets. Short of actually unplugging the devices each time, I would need to plug them into a switch box of some sort, let's say a surge protected power strip.
Each of those power strips has to be manufactured, packaged and then shipped to a storage location or store. They then have to be purchased by me and transported to my home. After that, the packaging material has to discarded - recycled if possible and landfilled if not - but in either case hauled away by a big truck and transported someplace else to be processed.
Each of those steps require "power", either directly or indirectly. In addition, I'd need multiple power strips since not only are the various devices located far apart from each other, they are not always used at the same time so can't be all powered off at once.
I wonder what the payback period is for the manufacture/shipping/ disposal steps of a single power strip vs. the power that a given device eats up by being left in "stand-by" mode.
e.g. How long does the clock on a microwave need to be left on to end up costing more than the power strip needed to turn it off?
P.S. Before you say "just unplug it", you should know that the plug for my microwave is *behind* the microwave, as is the plug for the main oven (and its clock), the plug for my TV, sound system, etc.
"Just unplug it" is not a viable solution.
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On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 10:19:48 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

And they buy cheap chinese power strips and the switch goes bad after a few months - becoming a fire hazzard
As for the clocks, they are more accurate if NEVER plugged in. They are dead accurate twice a day,

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On 11/22/2010 11:01 AM Jo spake thus:

By "connected to a wall switch" do you mean "*controlled by* a wall switch"? Not clear from your posting.
If so, then who says you aren't supposed to plug things in there? Maybe the people who want to keep charging you for "phantom" power?
Nothing I can think of would make this a bad thing, assuming you want the TV or whatever to be controlled by that switch.
Even high-current devices like electric heaters would be OK on a switch, provided they don't exceed its ratings (which, since they should be the same as the ratings of the entire circuit--wiring plus circuit breakers or fuses--should be fine). Low-power draws like TVs and other consumer electronic devices are OK.
(The intended purpose of such a setup is normally to control a light in the room from the wall switch.)
--
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with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
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On 11/22/10 2:01 PM, Jo wrote:

In a conventional automobile ignition, the spark happens when the power is interrupted. I once lost my TV and stereo to a surge when ice brought down the power line.
Electronic equipment is often shut off electronically. This can protect the equipment from surges that can happen when power is interrupted by a mechanical switch. If you made a habit of shutting off electronic equipment with a wall switch, it might not last as long.
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This is one reason why there is not an ignition coil connected to his TV.

Perhaps the transformer on the pole acted like the ignition coil in a car when the power was interrupted on the high voltage side (I don't know if this is possible). But since he would be breaking the connection between the TV and the transformer instead, I don't see how this is a concern.
Yes, there is probably a transformer in the power supply in the TV, but it will have a capacitor sized to absorb any spike it can produce when unplugged.
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You should not plug a TV into an outlet controlled by a switch as this will cause damage to the electronic components over time. Many modern components require time to shut down properly. While they all are built to survive sudden loss of power, doing this over and over may cause damage. The TV on/off switch will power the TV on/off more gracefully, and protect the components, giving your TV a much longer lifespan. As far as remembering channels, most TV's should be able to do that regardless.
As everyone else here mentioned, your bottom outlet is just a regular outlet, and you can plug anything into it.
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On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 07:23:30 -0800 (PST), John

MANY have no NVROM or NVRAM to maintain channel selections when the power is removed. You are still able to direct enter channels, but the "channell up" and "channel down" do not function untill re-programmed - and some revert to a default of ant of cable when powered off. Fine if you are using the default - but everytnhing above 13 goes away if it defaults to ant and you are using cable.

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On 11/23/10 2:36 AM, Larry Fishel wrote:

There's a capacitor on the primary of an ignition coil. A capacitor can reduce peak voltage but doesn't dissipate energy. On DC, inductive surges are often absorbed by diodes rather than capacitors.
The gentlest way to interrupt AC power to an inductor is to catch it at the part of the cycle when current isn't flowing. An electronic switch can do that.
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On Mon, 22 Nov 2010 23:36:53 -0800 (PST), Larry Fishel

longer if they are never turned off. (of course they last even longer if never plugged in - - -)
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On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 21:40:36 -0800, Smitty Two

cycling, which can cause a hard drive to fail quite quickly. As long as cooling is adequate, it is better to keep them running. Starting and stopping also subjects the motor and arm to startup forces and shut down forces, whichare hardert on the drives rather than running in a constant state. Stiction problems with the spindle motors are never a problem on drives that are not shut down. All electronics are sensitive to power spikes as well - which are virtually eliminated if the drives are kept running. I've got hard drives that are over 10 years old, still running, 24/7.
One is a 13 year old Maxtor 2.5gb - built Dec 24, 1997 in Singapore
Credible references?? Google Hard Drive Thermal cycling, and hard drive stiction and find them yourself - any I provide you guys will argue anyway.
The same principals apply to many other electronic devices - so just google thermal cycling electronic failure and power surge electronic failure and you'll find more than 3.
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