Outdoor Weatherproof Receptacles - Curiosity

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On Sun, 27 Apr 2008 14:49:22 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
[snip]

[snip]
There are not powerline-carrier devices, but hardwired (temporarily). I have my holiday lights flashing at about 1Hz. X10 devices are too slow for this. I have the relays linked using 6-wire telephone-type cable. The relays themselves are installed in plastic electrical boxes along with the controlled receptacles. They are located inside and plugged into a GFCI, with cords going out windows. The control signal comes from an old computer (Pentium 166) through a simple RS232-level buffer I built with a MAX233 IC.
BTW, The wires are assigned like this:
1 (white) exclusion line. This is on when the lights are and can be connected to NC relays to disable things that shouldn't be used at the same time as the holiday lights.
2 (black) lights on (+12V from wall-wart will be present from sunset to 10PM).
3 (red) flash 1. Output from computer serial port to flash lights. The computer switches the DTR line (connected to this) to say "Happy Holidays" in Morse code.
4 (green) flash 2. Logical NOT of above. However, both these lines can be made active to turn all lights on to take still pictures.
5 (yellow) ground. As you might have guessed, I originally planned this for 4 wires.
6 (blue) [reserved for future use]
These wires carry no voltages outside the range of -10V to +12V. The normal current is no higher than the few mA needed to operate the SSRs.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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On Sun 27 Apr 2008 02:31:41p, Mark Lloyd told us...

Very interesting installation! I'm sure it's really very nice, but I doubt I personally would have the patience to put it together. I think they call that "lazy". :-)
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Wayne Boatwright
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I think he is saying it would be better to put the GFCI in the <inside> box you have open. That way, if rain does happen to leak into the wire through the wall and shorts it out, the GFCI should trip. With the GFCI in the outside box, that short run that is near the weather is not protected. In general, the GFCI should be on the upstream end of any protected circuit.
-- aem sends...
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On Sat 26 Apr 2008 05:11:48p, aemeijers told us...

opening
sealant,
if
I understand your logic, and did that in the first house where I installed exteriors. However, considering the overall construction, the problem you describe is very unlikely to occur. Also, it's quite inconvenient if something outdoor trips the GFCI inside and whatever is using the outlet on the inside also goes out.
If you read Tony's subsequent post, I don't think mounting it inside is what he meant.
Thanks for your comments, however.
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Wayne Boatwright
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On Apr 26, 10:23 pm, Wayne Boatwright

I like your method. Each 'outside' outlet is its own GFCI and accessible from outside if/when it does trip. It protects whoever/whatever is plugged into that outside outlet in the event of anything causing a current unbalance in the live and neutral leads, such as leaky outdoor electric tool etc. Without disabling the whole circuit or tripping a GFCI breaker at the main or secondary circuit breaker panel somewhere inside the house. Which reminds me still have one outside outlet hardly ever used, not itself equipped with or protected by an upstream GFCI. Thanks for the reminder. terry
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On Sat 26 Apr 2008 07:40:54p, terry told us...

Thanks, Terry. It really works well for my purposes, and for the reasons you mention, and it doesn't inconvenient any inside outlets.
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