Outdoor Weatherproof Receptacles - Curiosity

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This is a question of curiosity more than anything, as I don't plan to make changes to the way I have installed outdoor outlets.
In several homes, including the present one where I am currently installing outdoor outlets, this has been my method...
At a point opposite on the inside of the house where a receptable already exists, I drill a hole in the outside wall (cedar), and from the inside, push through a length of exterior grade "romex" (the same guage as the interior wiring) through an existing self-clamping opening in the interior junction box to the outside and through the hole. I connect the inside wires to the existing receptacle.
On the outside, I seal the hole around the romex with silicone sealant, and mount an exterior weatherproof box (also sealed behind it with silicone swealant. After the sealant has cured, I connect a GFCI receptacle to the romex and mount it in the box. I then attach an "always in use" hooded cover plate to complete the installation.
While I know this has proven to be safe over all the years I've used this technique, I wonder whether it is really according to code, and if not, what exactly would the code require instead.
BTW, I currently live in Mesa, AZ, if that makes a difference.
Thanks for any responses.
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Wayne Boatwright
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Nothing wrong with your method. There is no need to use U.F. cable if you're running straight into the FS box.

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On Sat 26 Apr 2008 04:03:34p, RBM told us...

Thanks! Yes, I suppose you're right about the cable. I guess I just feel "safer" with it, and I usually have some around the house.
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

And better be on GFCI circuit.
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On Sat 26 Apr 2008 04:21:56p, Tony Hwang told us...

The receptacle I install in the box is GFCI. I need more than that?
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

You are OK then. My exterior ones are daisy chained. And Jacuzzi tub is the only one having it's own GFCI breaker.
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On Sat 26 Apr 2008 04:43:43p, Tony Hwang told us...

Each of my exterior outlets is a one-off with an indoor outlet (although some of these are on the same circuit in the main panel), and each has its own GFCI receptacle. Back in OH when we had a Jacuzzi tub, it also had its own GFCI breaker. I presently have no GFCI breakers in my main panel. For now I don't think there's a need. It's a brand new home, and every outlet that needs GFCI protection has it's on protected outlet.
One flaw that I made in the first house where I installed exterior outlets was replacing the interior receptacle with a GFCI, then feeding the exterior outlet. It was inconvenient when something outside would cause a fault and whatever was plugged in inside would also go out. Lesson learned. :-)
Thanks for your comments...
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On Sun, 27 Apr 2008 00:15:52 GMT, Wayne Boatwright

I know someone around here who has 2 exterior receptacles wired to interior ones, with the GFCI in the interior location. This makes it easy to control holiday lights without having to go out in bad weather.

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Mark Lloyd
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Never thought of doing that. The outlet I put in the front of my house is controlled by an indoor switch for that reason.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I just use digital timer. X-mas lights receptacle is built-in right under the eave and on exterior walls where needed.
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On Sat 26 Apr 2008 07:33:16p, Tony Hwang told us...

Wow, how handy is that! Wish I'd thought of doing that our house was being built.
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On Sat 26 Apr 2008 07:06:58p, Edwin Pawlowski told us...

Several houses ago, we had a house where recessed exterior cans were installed under all the eaves, all controlled by one switch. We didn't really use them often unless we were expecting company after dark, but they fixtures did come in handy during the holidays. We used screw-in plug adapters to power all of the house holiday lighting. One flip an everything was on or off.
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

After having 6 houses custom built not counting cottage still not 100% LOL! Now time has run out to try again. On wrong side of 60 now and don't feel like doing it again.
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On Sat 26 Apr 2008 09:42:15p, Tony Hwang told us...

I'm on th wrong side of 60, too, Tony. At 63, I doubt seriously we'll be doing another house. Heck, we've just been in this one 16 months. I doubt there's ever been a house built where some great idea or feature wasn't forgotten. On the whole, though, we're pretty happy with this one.
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On Sat 26 Apr 2008 06:25:59p, Mark Lloyd told us...

Well, yes it does, if you don't mind tripping the circuit and not being able to use the indoor socket when you want the holiday light off. I need the full time use of the interior sockets. As far as holiday lights, I have mine on weatherproof plug-in timers. I've also heard, though unsubstantiated, that it's not a good idea to use the GFCI "test" switch as an on/off switch. Apparently it wasn't meant for constant use as such.
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On Sun, 27 Apr 2008 02:31:02 GMT, Wayne Boatwright

I use a series of solid-state relays so all the holiday lights are controlled by ONE timer, and so go on and off at the same time. This is a temporary setup That I put out in the middle of October (a few Halloween lights). The individual outlets still have GFCIs.

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On Sun 27 Apr 2008 06:25:30a, Mark Lloyd told us...

Great idea... Are these anything like the X-10 devices? I used these in a previous home for all interior lighting, either in wall switches or plug-in modules.

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On Sun, 27 Apr 2008 14:49:22 GMT, Wayne Boatwright

An easy way to do this is to put an SSR in a Bell Box with a 120v cordset, receptacle and a low voltage cable going to a wall wart. Plug the wall wart into the timer controlled strings and plug the power to another circuit. Then you are still controlling additional lights with the timer but you are using another circuit.
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On Sun, 27 Apr 2008 11:08:24 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
[snip]

I do that, with long (low voltage) wires between them so all my lights come on and flash together. I have some pictures of the lights at http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com/winter.html Click on any thumbnail to see a larger picture.
You can't see the flashing in the pictures, but one side of the yard flashes "Happy Holidays" (or other sayings) in Morse code and the other side flashes out of phase (so there's always some lit).
All these used to require 7 circuits, but since most of the colored lights are LEDs, that's 4 circuits now. I now use 9 SSRs: 4 for always-on stuff, 4 for flashing lights, and 1 (NC) to disable an electric heater while the lights are on.
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On Sun 27 Apr 2008 02:43:53p, Mark Lloyd told us...

That's a beautiful holiday display!
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