OT: Used laptop to view Internet on TV

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I have cancelled cable because too expensive and too few (about 10) channels out of about 500 that interest me.
At first I tried an indoor antenna, but the stations it received were the pits.
Then I tried to mimic an HDMI connection from my computer (doesn't have HDMI)to TV, but ended up with about $100 worth of cables required for a suggested iffy VGA result in a different room from computer, so didn't get them.
Now looking at low-end laptop/tablet/whatever that does have a direct HDMI connection with my HDMI capable TV.
Was told that HDMI-capable laptops only came in about 4 years ago. T/F? If true, I might be able to score a used laptop/tablet that will do the job. Figured some people can always afford the latest and greatest, so might be selling their laptop/tablet/whatever.
Anybody tried used laptop/tablet with HDMI capability to watch TV?
Your input appreciated.
HB
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Higgs Boson wrote:

Hi, I hooked up Lenovo Thinkpad SL500 laptop to home theater system. It has HDMI and HD audio(digital 5.1 channel). My wife stream many soap operas, TV show, movie, etc. from our old country web sites. Works just fine. If your internet cable can sustain >5mbps steady you can watch video or whatever without any problem. Our cable hook up for Internet is 50/3. You just hook up the HDMI cabel from laptop to TV and activate dual monitor set up making laptop primary, TV set cloning what is displayed on laptop, it is done. So HDMI plus you better look for one with good video card which will give more than HD compatible resolution. Higher the better.
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On Tue, 18 Feb 2014 16:23:20 -0800 (PST), Higgs Boson

If you have a decent video card in your PC it will get you all your TV can reproduce right out of the 15 pin connector. (without the HDMI censorship)
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

It's not censorship, it's DRM. You can Google "HDCP" for the specs.
This will break it:
Cable Matters DVI and Coaxial/Toslink Audio to HDMI Converter (Amazon.com product link shortened)
So will this:
AVerMedia C985 Live Gamer HD 1080p Capture Card (Amazon.com product link shortened)
--

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety,
deserve neither liberty nor safety. - Ben Franklin
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On Sun, 23 Feb 2014 11:32:02 -0600, G. Morgan

Why bother with all of that if you have a decent video card in your PC? Just use the 15 pin connector and it will give you all the TV can reproduce and certainly all they are sending on a stream from Netflix, Amazon or Hulu.
GIGO.
It also does not take much PC to keep up with these streams. Just about anything that will run XP will do. I have been carrying a laptop on vacation for years to bypass all of those "rent a movies" in hotels and their WiFi seems to work fine. The only problem is when they have a LodgeNet TV that does not enable any ports other than the RF.
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On Sun, 23 Feb 2014 11:32:02 -0600, G. Morgan

Of course it is censorship. Right now they are selling it as protecting millionaire content providers from pirates but it is hardware that depends on encrypted tags and they can make those tags respond to anything they want.
A less benevolent government might decide anything they did not approve, was pirated material.
The first implementation I saw was a Comcast cable box that detected an HDMI splitter and shut it down with a nasty message that splitting the signal was not allowed.
Fortunately it did not care if you used the HDMI and the A/V out at the same time.
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On Tuesday, February 25, 2014 5:10:02 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

It's no more censorship than McAffee or Microsoft requiring you to have a license key to use their product and thereby limiting how many copies you can install. Is that censorhsip? If a company puts $100mil into making a movie, it seems perfectly reasonable that they can use HDMI or whatever technology they please, to limit your ability to copy, store, replay it, etc. to protect what they own. And if you don't like it, then you don't have to buy and/or watch it.

Yes, they could also call the tanks out into the streets. But if it gets to that it would seem to me that they'd be more interested in controlling the content of the CBS evening news as it's created, by having an actual censor sitting there, not using HDMI on it so you couldn't copy it, store it, etc.

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On Wed, 26 Feb 2014 06:27:30 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

McAfee does not have hardware built into my machine to enforce whatever limits they want to put on the content I try to run

This is a lot easier and cheaper than actually rolling tanks and it can be done very quietly. I just think HDMI is a scam and we are falling for it without even understanding what we are buying into.

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On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 10:56:08 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

No, but neither is anyone forcing you to view HDMI protected content if you don't choose to do so. What about cable boxes? Nothing in them to control what you have the right to view, what you've paid for, etc?

The minute the govt tries to use HDMI to limit freedom of the press, it would be front page news. And it would do no good. A govt that wants that kind of control has to control the NEWS and if you're going to do that, you'd do it at the source, not after the fact with HDMI.

I see it as a legitimate way to limit people from copying vidoes that cost $100mil to make and distributing them everywhere, illegally.
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On 2/18/2014 6:23 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

The simplest and cheapest approach to try first is Google Chromecast. It's a $35 android device about the size of a flash drive. Plug it into the HDMI port of your television, power it up, and link to it with your pc. At that point you can 'cast' pretty much anything you can play in your web browser to your television, including most streaming content such as from YouTube, Netflix, Hulu, etc.
Google has just opened it up for developers to create apps that will enable users to stream videos stored on their home network to their televisions. Once those apps are in place, you'll be able to play most videos and music you have in your personal digital collection.
For the price, it's worth trying out to see if it will fit your needs. If it doesn't work out, you're only out $35.
Another easy-to-use option for streaming digital content to the television is Roku. That runs about $90-$100, but again - integrates with your home wifi network, easy to use for online content.
If you are primarily interested in viewing digital video files from your personal collection, then a laptop would be the first and simplest choice. But for streaming internet content, the Chromecast and the Roku are simpler and much cheaper.
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Per Moe DeLoughan:

OTOH, perhaps the most expensive and complex approach is running a media app on a PC and watching recorded shows/movies via any device that does WiFi and/or any TV that you have hooked up to a little black box ("Media Extender").
Only shortcoming with WiFi is that it can't support 720 and above. 480 is fine... more exceeds the bandwidth.
A big advantage to me is the ability to skip commercials conveniently. I have not seen an entire commercial in over 5 years.
--
Pete Cresswell

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(PeteCresswell) wrote:

Hi, WiFi can stream full 1080P w/o any problem. I can do that sort of thing with my NAS which can even transcoding at reasonable speed.
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Per Tony Hwang:

Can you do it without transcoding?
If so, what WiFi standard? N?
I just got an 802.11ac WAP and can stream to my laptop no problem, but I'm still trying to get my Samsung P600 (which claims to do AC) to play 1080i without stuttering.
--
Pete Cresswell

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Higgs Boson wrote:

I'm using a Dell Inspiron N5050 with Win7 and an HDMI connector. I have connected the laptop to the HDMI of the TV with a 15 ft cable with great success. Have now added Chromecast to eliminate the cable. I see N5050 on ebay for $250-$350
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Higgs Boson wrote:

Just buy a Roku player for $50. It will outperform the laptop (especially an old underpowered one) for streaming. Add Hulu+ for $8/month and join Amazon Prime and you'll have all the TV/movies/music you can digest. ' The TV needs a HDMI in for hi-def. Your wireless network should have a router with "802.11 N" capabilities for fastest transfer, 802.11 "G" will work, but "N" is preferred.
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deserve neither liberty nor safety. - Ben Franklin
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On Sun, 23 Feb 2014 11:11:01 -0600, G. Morgan

I haven't tried Roku. This is what I use: http://store.digitalriver.com/store?Action=DisplayProductDetailsPage&Locale=en_US&SiteID=wdus&productID#7609800&themeID0153100
It does Youtube and Hulu, but what I use it for is for playing movies directly off my hard drive.
Anyone compared the two?
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On Sunday, February 23, 2014 10:50:43 AM UTC-8, Metspitzer wrote:

****GETTING LOST IN THIS IS WHAT I REALLY NEED: To get live programs on TV like I used to with cable.****
I can still play media etc. on my TV via DVD player, so that's not the problem.
Appreciate all the help.
HB
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Higgs Boson wrote:

I use a set of "rabbit ears" that costs about $10.99 in Best Buy. I live near Indianapolis so I get about 25 stations, many in HD. The only station I miss is CNBC for the financial news. From what I have seen, none of the "services" offer "live news" (like it sounds like you want). Try the rabbit ears and see how that goes!

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On Sunday, February 23, 2014 9:54:38 PM UTC-5, Bill wrote:

I was wondering that too, ie what exactly it is that the OP wants to receive. But presumably he's figured out that whatever it is, he can watch it on a PC now and he just wants to extend that to his TV. And he did say he used an indoor antenna, but the stations that it received were the pits. I took that to mean the content, not the signal quality, but who knows.
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On Monday, February 24, 2014 6:09:35 AM UTC-8, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

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You're correct; it WAS the content. Beyond description! and women sit the re all day in curlers and WATCH this stuff? (Snarky sexist stereotyping... )
About extending PC reception to TV: If that's the only way I can go, it me ans not watching LIVE. Like I just caught Jon Stewart's show of last night on PC today. Means I have to sit in front of PC.
However, the people on this thread who recommended the little "computer" th at plugs right into the TV's HDMI, are right up my alley, because that gadg et -- what was the name again? -- would enable receiving programs LIVE.
Bottom line: I want to receive LIVE programming on my TV w/o cables runnin g from PC one room to TV in another. All the cables and other shit would a dd up to quite a bit, so I will explore the options suggested that (a) plug into TV or (b) can direct TV in same room.
EVERYBODY HAS BEEN SUPER COOL ABOUT HELPING!
HB
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