OT Sunken Ship Rescue - One of the most fascinating TV shows I've seen lately

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It's even more! It's 1.5 billion Euros. Wiki says:
On 14 July 2014, work commenced to refloat Costa Concordia in preparation for towing. At this point, the costs had risen to 1 billion euros. Including tow cost, 100 million for the ship to be broken up for scrap and the cost of repairing damage to Giglio island, the estimated final cost was expected to be ?1.5 billion ($2 billion)
Holy cow! A reminder to keep your ships off the rocks. Or sink them deep in the ocean where no one cares. (-:
--
Bobby G.





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According to reports it was $1.5 billion to get righted and ready for removal to the scrapping yard. Don't know how much it took to get it there and torn apart.
--
?Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive,
but what they conceal is vital.?
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On Thursday, July 23, 2015 at 5:04:46 PM UTC-5, Robert Green wrote:

of it again last night. Yes, it was very interesting. I wish NOVA would do another show letting us see some of the salvaging they are doing in Genoa.
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In alt.home.repair, on Thu, 23 Jul 2015 18:46:51 -0700 (PDT),

What are they doing in Genoa?
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On Thursday, July 23, 2015 at 11:18:38 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

and sell the scrap metal and whatever else they could salvage.
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wrote:

I'm betting all that time soaking underwater reduced the overall salvage value a bit.
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Bobby G.



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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 24 Jul 2015 09:49:05 -0400, "Robert Green"

Yeah, but I still want to get one of the deck chairs. They're meant to get wet.
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<stuff snipped>

You might have something there. People probably would like to have a souvenir from a wreck like that. I always thought we should have taken Osama Bin Laden and sliced him up into incredibly thin slices with a microtome that could be sold to souvenir hunters. I'll bet a lot of religious zealots would have paid top dollar for a vacuum pack slice. Premiums could be charged for important slices. It's something not without precedent:
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2487/what-happened-to-napoleons-penis
Eeeewww!
--
Bobby G.



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In alt.home.repair, on Sat, 25 Jul 2015 09:51:54 -0400, "Robert Green"

On second thought, you could buy them in Italiy, but in the US, the Dept. of Agricullture would object to the barnacles etc. that are attached to the deck chairs. And without them, half of the ambiance would be gone.

I think I'll skip this.
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<stuff snipped>

I was trying to read the newsgroup at the same time but this NOVA was so remarkably compelling I turned the PC off.
Another one I liked was the restoration of (I believe) the Acropolis where when taking apart the columns they found cedar centering blocks inside that had been hermetically sealed and still smelled pungently.
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Bobby G.

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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 24 Jul 2015 01:09:49 -0400, "Robert Green"

Horrors, man. What's wrong with you.
Next you'll be turning the tv off to talk to people in living room.

Wow. So even in those days, construction wasn't like it seemed.
(I found out that those tall mulit-layer wedding cakes have an interior non-edible structure. Until I was 16, I assumed like two layer 4" cakes, you could just have 18 inch tall cakes.
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<stuff snipped>

Now let's not go to extremes!

They had polished the column sections so flat and smooth that no air got in to the center of the column. They built it all without cranes or machinery, and IIRC, they did it by building ramps around the perimeter that rose up as the building did. BTW, it was the Parthenon, not the Acropolis. Brain fart.
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/parthenon/time-nf.html
<< 1975-Present Rstoring the Parthenon Since 1975, the Acropolis Restoration Project team, headed by Greek architect Manolis Korres, has spent roughly $90 million to restore the Parthenon and surrounding structures. The team has inventoried and measured thousands of marble fragments scattered across the Acropolis. Korres plans to place each salvageable chunk in its original position, while new marble from the very quarry that initially supplied stone for the temple will fill in gaps where possible, with non-corrosive titanium rods holding the masonry together. All remaining original sculptures have now been removed to the climate-controlled Acropolis Museum, their places on the Parthenon taken by exact replicas. Despite all these efforts, the Parthenon, when it finally reopens, will remain a partial ruin, with traces of the original temple, church, and mosque intentionally left intact-a testament to its multifarious past. >>

Another balloon burst. I used to think it was "Chester" drawers instead of "chest of drawers."
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Bobby G.



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In alt.home.repair, on Sat, 25 Jul 2015 14:20:50 -0400, "Robert Green"

I thought that was the pyraminds, not the Parthenon. At least the "around the perimeter".

I used to know his brother Festus.
Speaking of drawers, two networks last week talked about the two kids killed when Ikea chests fell over, and I think I saw one and it only talked about Ikea. Heck, any chest (as opposed to a dresser, which in my world is shorter and probably wider) can fall over if you pull most of the drawers out, especially the drawers at the top. Inside Edition included this in passing in 3 words, but it too concentrated on Ikea. What a bad rap. Nothing about the ikea chest looked different to me from any other chest.
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It apparently was a pretty common building technique for anything that required placing heavy stones atop one another. IIRC, even the builders of Stonehenge used similar ramps and excavations at the site have found remains of the ramp works. What other way except magic could they raise the huge multi-ton lintel stones to sit atop the columnar supports?

IIRC Ikea includes a wall mounting kit to secure their furniture so it really is a bad rap for them. I suspect they're also victim of the "sue the deepest pocket" rule employed by aggressive attorneys.
I also read that a lot of kids are injured and even killed when they tug on wires and Daddy's 50" HDTV lands on them.
One thing that really surprised me is how many toddlers drown in the 5 gallon general purpose buckets. Apparently they are just tall enough to allow a toddler to fall in head first and then it's the end of the line. Another baby-killer you might not suspect are drapery cords. Kids hang themselves in those all the time. I believe that now they have to be designed to be not so lethal, but it's late and I am too lazy to look it up. (-:
--
Bobby G.



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In alt.home.repair, on Sat, 25 Jul 2015 23:35:05 -0400, "Robert Green"

Yes.

I heard something about drapery cords. My drapery cord frayed to the point of breaking after 32 years, and it turns out no one sells brown/white anymore. Only white. So I'm buying 50 feet of imitation parachute cord from home depot. it won't get noticeably dirty so fast. but it doesnt' feel the same and I'm unhappy.
I was a child once and I had two matching chests (not so much for my own clothes but extra storage for my mother.) There's no doubt either would have fallen over if I'd pulled the drawers out, but I don't remember ever doing that or ever trying to climb to the top. No one ever considered screwing them to the walls, and cetainly no one blamed the furniture maker if somethng like this happend.
I still have chests that fall over like this. One has the bottom two drawers full of steel tools and the top two drawers full of maps or colored paper.

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Especially since most of what they were doing hadn't been actually tried before in these circumstances. I saw one (might have been this one) and what struck me was how many times the people they interviewed said something along of the lines "Well, this SHOULD work." The divers were ones who had the brass balls. If something the engineers cooked up hadn't worked, basically the entire ship would have fallen on their heads.
--
?Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive,
but what they conceal is vital.?
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wrote:

They talked about how the Concordia was so large that even techniques that refloated the smaller(!) battleship Oklahoma might have failed because of the sheer size of the ship. It was always threatening to break apart for one reason or another. It was really apparent, once refloated (sort of - the sponsons actually did the floating, I think) how quickly the sea corrodes (and covers with creatures) anything sitting in it for long.
One of the divers did get killed, but I got a phone call during the show so I might have missed how it happened. Didn't we used to have a salvage diver in the group? Steve B?
--
Bobby G.






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On Thu, 23 Jul 2015 16:44:36 -0500, Robert Green

There was a show called Outrageous Acts of Science on the Science Channel last winter. It might still be on but I get busy in the summer. The scientists search YouTube for the odd things people do for stunts then explain the science behind the tricks. One trick was lighting a candle from its smoke.
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On 7/24/2015 9:15 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:

Do you mean vapor, not smoke?
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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