OT: Snowblower Feet/skids

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Anyone familiar with the 2 cycle snowblowers is aware they have height adjusting metal skids or feet on each side of the auger housing(at least my Craftsman does). Those feet eventually grind down and need replacing every so often, depending on use, of course. I was thinking of making new skids out of a tougher material but unsure of what that material could be. It would obviously need to withstand the grinding of the concrete much longer than the metal.
The metal skid is simply a flat stock bent to a 90 degree and slightly arced where it makes contact with the ground. When it grinds away, I'm left with a piece of sharp metal sticking straight down and gouging into the cement, making it very difficult to push the blower as well as ruining the concrete. If I used a solid piece of, let's say, acrylic, it may grind down, but it'll remain whole and allow me to still push the blower, until it bottoms out on the scraper bar.
What material could be used to make new skids?
Thanks
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On 1/6/14, 7:45 AM, Meanie wrote:

Can you change the skid to a wheel/caster ??
BTW. think you meant "2 stage", not "2 cycle".
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No, he meant 2 cycle single stage - I think - but the 2 stage blowers have them too.
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I don't know that I've ever seen a single stage thrower with skid shoes. I thought the purpose of the skid shoes is to keep the scraper bar of a two stage blower off the ground so that it didn't catch grooves, cracks etc. A single stage unit gets it's drive from the rubber flappers on the auger so it has to be closer to the ground.
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On Tue, 7 Jan 2014 03:30:25 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

I've had several single stage "blowers" that were wheel driven and had skid shoes. Snow "throwers" or "power shovels" have rubber augers that propel the unit and do not (generally) have shoes.
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Interesting. I went from a couple of beat up "throwers" over the years to a two-stage unit three seasons ago. None of my throwers had shoes. They were all hand me downs that I barely kept alive until the next not-as-bad one came along.
My Ariens SnoTek 24" isn't the highest end machine, but it clears snow pretty well. Love that rooster tail!
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On Wed, 8 Jan 2014 03:23:00 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

I differentiate between throwers and blowers - blowers are wheel drive or track drive machines with steel augers. single stage blowers fling the augers real fast while 2 stage chew with the augers and blow with a fan. Throwers have flexible augers that rotate forward at high speed and (can) scrape the snow to bare pavement with no damage. They have wheels. Power shovels are scaled down throwers with no wheels
That's MY differentiation. Blowers have shoes - single stage or dual stage. Throwers generally do not and power shovels do not. The single stage blowers I had were 5HP and up 4 stroke behemoths. Likely 45 - 50 years old now.
You want to see a rooster tail you gotta see a Yamaha YT624 at work. That sucker blows snow a good 40 feet. And with the hydro drive you can run wide open all the time with total control over drive speed.
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Your differentiation of throwers vs. blowers is pretty much the accepted differentiation amongst snow moving machine aficionados.
Here's my next machine, a 3 stage monster.
http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh227/spectrum_pb/snowvintage/amf3.jpg
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On Wed, 8 Jan 2014 11:55:10 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

2 stage double auger - actually used to be relatively common around here. (tractor mounted - and the city has them on "trackless" machines for sidewalk clearing.
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Scroll down this page and you'll see that they were sold as 3 stage machines, at least according to the site.
http://www.gilsonsnowblowers.com/snowvintage.html
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On Thu, 9 Jan 2014 00:37:28 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

The owner/writer of that page called them 3 stage. (AMF,Jari, Lommbard and MotoMower Snow Shark) Doesn't mean they were sold as such. And while you are looking at that page, did you notice all the big old single stage blowers?? I remember those blowers being sold as "drift busters" and the "drift buster" was an option on some.
I remember a lot of those machines as new or relatively new.
On the other hand, Cub Cadet DOES build a 3 stage blower - gather, break up, and blow. See http://www.cubcadet.com/equipment/cubcadet/snow-throwers/3X-three-stage-power
Not sure why they call this one a 3 stage
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wxJwYk-g5M

Not like this one - http://www.mytractorforum.com/attachment.php?attachmentidV8497&d 85578580 which is a standard dynamark with the optional drift buster - and notice the rollers instead of sliding shoes.
In investigating farther, it appears they WERER sold as 3 stage - at least the dynamark in the USA - http://www.ebay.ca/itm/DYNAMARK-26-3-STAGE-SNOWBLOWER-SNOWTHROWER-PART-MANUAL-/370466315864
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Perhaps you weren't reading the same part of the site that I was. In the section entitled AMF, there is a picture of the machine I linked to earlier. The text says "On the right is a 6 horsepower 26-inch machine that is a prime example of what was sold as a 3-stage machine mainly in the 1970s. The shaft of skewed disks churned high banks down for the main auger to digest. "
...interesting links snipped,,,
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On 1/6/2014 11:55 AM, Retired wrote:

You're right, I meant 2 stage.
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On 1/6/2014 11:55 AM, Retired wrote:

...and I like the caster idea. Something I obviously didn't think about.
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On 1/6/2014 8:47 PM, Meanie wrote:

My snow blower has a couple plastic wheels. It's a 3 HP or so, Toro single stage with gas mixer engine. Some how, I can run it on rock driveway without throwing too much gravel and rock. Helps when the ground is frozen, and I lean down a bit on the handle so the spinner is up an inch or so.
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Check out the skid shoes with casters here...
http://www.snowblowersdirect.com/stories/130-How-to-Pick-the-Perfect-Replacement-Skid-Shoes.html
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Consider a pair of composite skid shoes. They don't rust, they don't mar concrete surfaces, they supposedly glide easier and they are reversible so you can flip them over when they wear. I don't have any experience with them, but it is my understanding that they last longer than metal skid shoes. DAGS
I plan to either buy a pair do composites when I need them, or I might do what is described below...
I've also heard of people making their own from HDPE cutting boards. They screw two pieces together to get the correct thickness. They also make them reversible like the composite ones that you can buy.
Have fun!
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On 1/6/14, 7:45 AM, Meanie wrote:

FWIW,
Ariens sells a replacement "skid shoe" made of polyethylene
http://ariens.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/121/kw/skid%20shoe
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wrote:

Just get a standard shoe and have a welder lay a few beads of hard-coat on the bottom. Basically like carbides.
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On Monday, January 6, 2014 5:21:18 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yep, hard surfacing is the answer. Many farmers who use cultivators do this routinely on their cultivator shovels...I know I do.
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