OT Power Point

I have been messing about with MS Power Point. Done OK but the files are huge. I get PP stuff by email and the files are much smaller and also I notice when saved, have a different icon.
Why is this and can I make the files smaller somehow?
I have windows XP.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You need to start with smaller images. By smaller, I mean the file-size of each picture needs to be made smaller. Each picture will add to the size of the PPT file. For example, if you've inserted 4 pics, each originally 500K, the resulting PPT will be over 2MB.
How large (file size) are the images you're inserting into your slide show?
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Could be the way it is saved.
*.ppt *.pps
or the open document format. they all produce different size files.
----------------------------------------------------------- Get free backup service using Drop Box Access your files from your smartphone or tablet Bonus space provided using this link: http://db.tt/RIONkfbZ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can also compress any files using zip.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I should have added that the solution to this is to just look at the extension on the file type on the smaller files, eg .zip, .ppt, etc. Googling will tell you what kind of file it is and how it was produced.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK, here's what I just tried:
I saved a 6.7Mb ppt file and a 3.5Mb ppt file as pps files and they saved with a file size within a few Kb of the original. So saving them as pps files does not condense them at all. That makes sense, since you can simply change the file extension from ppt to pps (and vice- versus) to create slideshows and/or normal presentations. It's the same file, the extension just tells PowerPoint how to open it.
The next thing I tried was this:
I exported all the slides as jpg files (Save as *.jpg) which creates a folder full of jpgs, one jpg for each slide.
I then ran a macro to create a new PowerPoint document made up of the jpgs The macro can be found here:
http://www.pptfaq.com/FAQ00352_Batch_Insert_a_folder_full_of_pictures-_one_per_slide.htm
This created PowerPoint files of 2.3Mb from the 6.5Mb file and 1.7Mb from the 3.5Mb file.
So basically, I was able to condense the files by about 1/3 to 1/2 by exporting the slides as jpgs and then rebuilding the presentation from those same jpgs.
Hope that helps!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In addition, I just tested my earlier process with jpgs I already had on my system.
I inserted 3 jpgs into a powerpoint document. Each jpg was approximately 500K. The filesize of the resulting ppt file was 1.6Mb.
I then exported the jpgs (Save as...*.jpg) and it created 3 jpgs of 85 - 90 Kb.
When I built a ppt with these new jpgs, the file size was 323Kb.
So, take your huge file, export all of the slides via Save as *.jpg, then rebuild the ppt via the macro and you will greatly reduce the file size.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

True...but he said he already had a presentation built so I offered the steps to make it smaller.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/1/2012 9:10 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

:)
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/1/2012 8:26 AM, Tegger wrote:

Resizer for Windows program. MS made a version for XP that doesn't work in Win7. But I found and installed a Win7 version from Brice Lambson that you can get here: http://imageresizer.codeplex.com/releases/view/82827
Looks/feels/works the same way it did in XP. It installs into the shell and after installation a right click on the file name in windows explorer adds the resize option to the action list that will open. Very intuitive and effective.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use it too. You have to wonder why it isn't just a standard part of the Windows package by now. I guess it's because Windows still isn't as userfriendly and neat of a package as windows.
Speaking of which, I recently got a chance to try an iPad. Boy was I shocked. Using google maps on there I was able to move so smoothly and quickly with the map being constanly refreshed that I was shocked. Using my finger I went from my home in central NJ all the way to Lake George, NY with resolution set at just a few miles. I was just scrolling to see how fast it could keep up. In no time I was at NYC, so I just kept scrolling up the Hudson River, and it just kept going. Within about 2 minutes I was at Lake George, seeing everything in between scroll by. Other web apps performed with blazing speed too.
That was with a wireless G connection. With my wired connection and a one year old high end desktop PC, no way it can do that. I don't know if the difference is the OS or the hardware, but it's amazing. Even more so that they can do it on a small battery powered device. They use an ARM CPU designed by Apple and fabbed by Samsung.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

JPG are already compressed, so even if you try to compress it via zip, etc it may not compress much more.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Then you need to reduce them in Photoshop to a smaller size. Try 72dpi and as small an image size as will show up correctly in the PPT. Also slide the "quality" slider down to 6 or 4 when you make the JPEG. This can have a dramatic effect on file size.
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/1/2012 1:03 PM, Tegger wrote:

does a lot of media generation, a digital image editing program, such as photoshop is clearly a useful, important and flexible tool. However, it takes a certain amount of time to become familiar with how to use the program, even the simpler versions. Many folks have made careers from teaching photoshop courses. It is not exactly a user friendly program for the casual recreational PC user. Using a digital image editing program to reduce the pixel content of an image requires reasonable knowledge of what final specifications you're aiming to achieve, and a goodly number of mouse clicks unless you write a macro for subsequent image reduction tasks (and writing photoshop macros that work effectively takes time to learn).
For the occasional user who knows nothing about pixel density, number of colors, image dimensions, lossy versus lossless compression algorithms, ultimate file size, etc, etc, the beauty of the windows image resizer is that the entire process only takes 2-3 mouse clicks and requires no technical knowledge at all to successfully reduce a large image file to a much smaller file that sill looks excellent on a computer monitor. It probably will suffice for the great majority of users who want to reduce 2-8 Mb image files to a few hundred Kb when uploading image files to their own web pages, or as attachments to friends and family, or for producing effective power point files that aren't bloated. You don't need a Lamborghini to get yourself into town to run errands.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

To check fhe file size and picture quality in Photoshop, go to Edit > Image Size.
You can change those parameters in the same dialog box.

Screen resolution (72dpi) is all that's needed for computer-screen viewing. Anything higher than that is a waste of disk space on a file that's meant for online viewing.
Anything higher than 72 dpi is meant for printing. 300 dpi is a standard resolution for litho, but even that tends to get dumbed-down to closer to 150dpi in production.

The online tutorials you can find on YouTube are better.
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

re"...when saved, have a different icon"
What is the 3 or 4 letter extension on the file name?
ppt or pptx was saved as a "standard" PowerPoint document (the x being for Office versions 2007 and beyond). Open it and you'll have access to the individual slides.
pps or ppsx was saved as a PowerPoint slide show (the x being for Office versions 2007 and beyond). Open it and and the slide show will run automatically.
They may have been saved as a pdf document, which would typically be much smaller. Open it and you'll see the individual slides, but they won't really be PowerPoint slides. They're actually individual pages in a PDF document.
If it's not one of those 5 extensions, tell us what it is and we'll see what else we can offer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.