OT: nitrogen tires

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Nope. You dont run 35 PSI on a 1 ton Ford, or Dodge. You sure dont do it with Firestone Steeltex, or Michelin E rated tires. They are designed to have, 80PSI on a cold tire, unloaded. You add in racks, parts, tools, etc, and you have tossed one hell of a load on the tire. Now, to overcome sidewall flex, and wear on the outer edges, you simply go to the maximuim inflation pressure, and thats 95-100PSI. My car tires, as information, depending on the tire, rim size, and application, can have as little as 15PSI in them, or as much as 50. Passenger car tires also are NOT filled to the pressures listed on the sidewall, but to the pressures listed on the data sheet for that particular model. The rating on the passenger car tire that you see, is the MAX inflation that the particular tire can take. You do NOT run 35PSI in say...the rear tires of a 911, unless you enjoy having the rear sling around on you in a hard turn with your foot off the gas.
a 245-80-16-E can take it. and have for years. We average 75,000 miles on a set, and have gotten more....not bad for a multitude of drivers, diffferent weights, road conditions...etc.

Nope. We started this when 80PSI was creating a soft ride condition, and excessive wear on the rear tires. Braking is fine, and handling is much improved.

Umm..its an inert diatomic gas. Seriously...correct me if I am wrong..I mean..since its the only approved gas for brazing to reduce oxidation in the field I am in, and one of those guys that we have to see for at least 6 hours a year to keep our licence that have more chem experence than me just might be wrong....but I doubt it seriously.

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Nitrogen is not inert. However, it's very nearly inert in many applications. That's why it can be considered inert much of the time.
Inert gases do not react chemically with other elements - helium, xenon, neon, krypton, argon, radon are inert. Nitrogen will react with other elements and form compounds. However, the fact that many of them are not greatly stable (many explosives, rocket fuel etc) shows how much nitrogen would rather not form a bond with other elements.
BTW, I've never heard of N2 being used in tires for any reason other than the fact that N2 is less permeable than O2 and thus the tires don't have to be re-inflated as often. Hearing other reasons is interesting.
Mike
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wrote:

applications.
neon,
Ok...teach me something here...
If its not inert, why does EVERY instructor, every contractor in HVAC that has a clue, and every thermal dynamics course state that it is, and THATS why we use it when we braze copper at over 1800F? Zero reaction with the copper, or the filler material. Also, looking at my ARI manual, it sure as hell states, to use inert Nitrogen flowing into the pipes when brazing...
Just curious..
Also, when I worked in Germany at MBB, we were told it was inert, and thats another reason we used it for other apps than just in the tires.

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http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/chem00/chem00091.htm
CBhVAC:) wrote:

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CBhVAC:) writes:

Your pusillanimous critic has a 1950s high school chemistry background, where they told you only the "noble gases" were truly "inert". In fact, some compounds have been discovered. So nothing is absolutely inert.
Nitrogen *is* inert inside a copper pipe at brazing temperatures. That is, it doesn't react with the copper (or the oil residue in a HVAC system).
I use CO2 instead of N2 for this purpose. It works as well, is cheaper, less hazardous (lower tank pressure), and has swell household uses (http://www.truetex.com/carbonation.htm ).
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i raced a 24 hour endurance at Nelson Ledges (OH) many many years ago on a gsxr 750. i think we filled up the tank 20 times in one day and the tires 3 times.

not
$1.70
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You
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i never said i couldn't afford to drive it. i'm looking at fuel savings, not an opinion on needs. i wanted to know if N2 tires did anything to improve gas mileage. if gas mileage was my main concern, i would have purchased a sub-compact car (or a motorcycle). i drive a durango and my wife just bought a suburban (z71).

i can afford it, but you are correct on the internet service. 2-way satellite is very expensive and not worth $70/month.
and thanks for your input on N2 tires...
-a|ex
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to
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Nitrogen doesn't expand as much as air as temperatures increase and it is usually dryer (less water) so the inflation pressure of your tires won't change as much and possibly affect rolling resistance.
Stated another way, your cold tire pressure will be higher and will require less horsepower to move your car. But... I doubt very seriously you will ever see a difference if you keep your tires properly inflated in the first place. Two things most people don't do is change the oil or check their tires. Why do you think all those SUVs roll over so often? Ever notice how many cars on the road (and at 80+ MPH) have one or more tires bulging at the bottom?
Race car tires often are inflated with nitrogen or even helium because the cold to hot temperature ranges are pretty extreme. It effects tire grip, longevity and consistency so the extra cost is worth it to most racers.
Hope this helps answer your query. If you really want to get better gas mileage just press down on the go peddle more lightly, mind the speed limit signs or car pool and share the cost.
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Philip E. Davis writes:

19th century scientists knew better than such a superstition. Boyle, Charles, and Dalton; PV = nRT and all that.
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Stupid idea. Normal air is 78% nitrogen. At best, using pure nitrogen might reduce oxidation on the inside of the tire over a period of several years. Of course, the outside of the tire will wear out long before then.
To reply, please remove one letter from each side of "@" Spammers are VERMIN. Please kill them all.
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Just filling a tire will not give you a 100% N2 atmosphere inside.The tire has to be emptied and refilled with N2 several times to purge the 'normal' atmosphere left inside when the tire was mounted on the rim.
The N2 is drier than what comes out of most compressors,especially the ones at filling stations(how well are those maintained,tanks drained,etc.?) Water,O2,carbon in the tire,steel/Aluminum in the rim, all will react where N2 would not.A corroding rim will leak faster,not seal as good.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik-at-kua.net
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Nitrogen in the tires won't increase the gas mileage significantly (i.e., at least 5%) or insignificantly.
The propeller-like device is sold under the name "Tornado" and was found in tests done by Consumer Reports to give no significant improvement. If such devices did help, don't you think car makers would mold them into the plastic intake pipes, which would cost virtually nothing? Earlier, Consumer Reports tested certain spark plugs and found that they also made no difference.
Either learn to live with your SUV mistake or join a car pool.
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On 29 May 2004 00:48:41 -0700, do_not_spam snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com (do_not_spam_me) wrote:
Ahhhh, come on now..... Spam is fun. I think I'll spam you just to prove it !!!!
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