OT Fahrenheit

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wrote:

And at the time, humans thought that THEY were the most important things in existence.

Could that just be what you're used to? The ratio (size of C degree to size of F degree) is less than 2:1.

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Mark Lloyd wrote:

I don't follow. We're talking about people and weather, so why would anything else be relevant?

Yet we generally use fractional degrees C, but not F. I'm talking practice, not theory.
Brian
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wrote:

Reality does tend to be inconvenient sometimes. Notice how it fails to step out of the way at those times.

It's probably an artifact of conversion. People use fractional degrees C, only because they're used to degrees of a certain size, not because such a size is in any way better.

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Default User wrote:

Granularity? You mean spacing? Doesn't matter my electronic F deg thermometers measure in tenths anyway.

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On Fri, 10 Nov 2006 02:57:02 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

I have such a thermometer too. Usually the accuracy of the thermometer is so low that the extra digit provides no useful information. I round those numbers almost automatically. One night the low was 32F (the actual display was 31.8F).

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Mark Lloyd wrote:

temperature I round it. The real issue is that most people use thermometers to determine temperatures that are constantly changing. Check a digital one with an outside probe attached. The inside temperature is in a housing that is heavy enough to act as a heat reservoir so the temperature changes slowly, while the outside one has hardly any heat sink.
I have a dual sensor thermometer sitting on a file case in my office. Under carefully controlled conditions both the internal and the outside sensors read the same. In actual practice the outside and inside sensors seldom read the same even though the sensors are only 5 inches apart. I can walk past the sensors (about 2 feet away) and stir the air enough that the outside sensor changes 0.4-0.5 degrees.
Outside, temperatures often fluctuate so much that anything less that a degree makes no sense. I find it hilarious to listen to the weatherman say excitedly say that the first freezing night of the fall was 27 degrees. What he never says is the period. That low of 27 degrees may have existed less than a minute and most likely less than 5 minutes and the time below 32 degrees may have been less than 10 minutes.
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Terry wrote:

What does that next to last sentence say... I don't even want to venture a guess.
Depends on your location relative to thermostat location. Typically thermostats are located on an interior wall. If where you sit is close to an exterior wall where the sun strikes the building, especially if you're sitting near a window, then the radiant heat energy through the wall in that general area can easily cause the temperature there to be 5F or more higher than your thermostat setting (all cats know this intuitively)... place a thermometer on your computer desk. You can try positioning a few small fans throuhgout your house to more evenly distribute air, as your hot air system is not on all the time, probably less than half the time. My office is at a point furthest from the house thermostats (I have two), and that room is at a southwest corner so it receives full sun all day, and has two large windows, which contribute to a greenhouse effect, so where I sit the temperature can be at least 5F warmer than the rest of the house, and that even though my central air system contains an AprilAire filtration system that runs at low speed all year (only switches to high fan when the system calls for AC) so the air throughout my house is constantly circulating, but that does not negate radiant heat from an exterior wall, it's like sitting in front of a heat lamp. I could move my desk to the opposite side of the room so I'll be at the interior wall but I enjoy being able to look out the window too much, so I endure the warmer temperature... my thermostats are set at 69F, the rest of the house is pretty close to that temperature (+/-1F) but my office is at 73F as I type... the sun is very bright right now.
Sheldon
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