OT Fahrenheit

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Mark Lloyd wrote:

Actually mine is at 65 right now. That is my usual daytime temperature. At night it goes to 62 In the evening I go up to 67 and in the morning right before we get up, I have it go to 69
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Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

evening. If we're cold, it gets cranked up but we usually don't. Sweaters and sweats are the norm. The cats have coats on. ;-)
BTW, our frost line can go down beyond 7' (broken mains down that far).
-- Keith
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krw wrote:

It is snowing and 30 degrees out now so I just chunked another piece of wood on the fire :)
Harry K
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

Chucked
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Peter Aitken
Visit my recipe and kitchen myths pages at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

That sucks! I had another nice day to work outside. It was a glorious 62F here in NW Vermont. I think I got sunburnt though. It's only supposed to be 50F tomorrow, but that's enough to finish my stain and trim work.
It is time to get the wife's snow tires on though. ...or I'm going to be driving her to work.
-- Keith
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On Thu, 09 Nov 2006 12:41:51 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

Maybe that thermostat was off, and it was actually 55 that was too cold.
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46 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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On Thu, 09 Nov 2006 16:03:31 -0600, Mark Lloyd

What matters is the temperature where you sit, compute, sleep, etc.
In my house, the thermostat is in a warm spot, and most of the places I actually spend time are 2 - 3 degrees cooler than the setting.
So, if you want to deal with the actual temperature, check the temperature where you actually do things, and set the thermostat up or down to make your specific areas be the temperature you want.
You may want them at 68, or at 73, I don't care, but use a thermometer, and set the thermostat to give the temp you want were you spend time.
Alan
= It's not that I think stupidity should be punishable by death. I just think we should take the warning labels off of everything and let the problem take care of itself.
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snipped-for-privacy@visi.com says...

Luckily it has been far warmer than usual here in the northeast. Daytime temps have been low 50's to high 60's. Night temps are getting down there but with day temps so high, the heat hardly runs and the place states near 70F.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

From 5:30AM to 8:30AM mine goes to 67F, then 62F until 4:30PM back to 67F until 11:45PM and then to 62F.
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snipped-for-privacy@xmail.com0.invalid says...

For some reason, it was elected to keep the operations center (computer room) at my office at 65F. It is very cool in there.
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wrote:

I am not sure why people think computer rooms should be that cold. The official IBM spec for a data center was 75F at 50%RH.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

In our case the costs of power, heating and cooling are fixed for the next ten years in the square footage cost.
We do run half lighting most times though, to save energy. :)
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On Fri, 10 Nov 2006 22:18:12 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The lower temperature may to deal with all the mobile heat sources (people) that enter the area.
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44 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 13:16:56 -0600, Mark Lloyd

We took the expected latent heat load into account when trhe system was sized. That still does not address what you set the thermostat and humidistat to. Thw Weksler chart in a computer room is 2 concentric rings when things are running right
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     snipped-for-privacy@aol.com writes:

In most places I've been, the rooms run at 21C (70F). The RH is then adjusted to stop the room feeling too cold to humans in cases where they have to work in there for long periods. (A dry 21C with significant wind chill feels very much colder than 21C.)
--
Andrew Gabriel

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On 12 Nov 2006 08:31:22 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

Maintaining RH at 50% is mostly to make the paper (cards in the olden days) more machine friendly. At lower RH static is a problem and at higher RH the paper stiffness suffers and it swells imparing feeding.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

Not true at all. A high RH contributes to failures in electronics as well. Even recent equipment is specified from 40-60% RH, over a fairly narrow temperature range.
--
Keith

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A production laser printer will be wadding up paper long before the electronics start complaining. If the paper is too wet it will curl when it goes through the fuser. A big printer shoving that paper out at 3 pages a second will turn the stacker into something that looks like a carnation.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

card readers that are in controlled environments.
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Keith

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I think people are far too concerned with the rest of the electronics. DASD in a data cernter is just the same drives you have in your PC piled in a big box these days and the processors are not that much different than your PC. It is certainly a similar packaging. I have PCs running in totally unconditioned space in SW Florida with no problems. In fact one survived a fire. 3 are running in vehicles that see 130-140F in the day time and wide swings in RH. IBM started saying in the 80s that if the people could handle the environment the computer could. 4300 mainframes and AS/400 mid range were "office environment" machines. It was really the big paper pushers that needed conditioned space.
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