OT Did people only use bumper jacks?

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On May 21, 11:04 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Alright, I'll admit it, my ringtone is based on the '66 Ambassador I owned up until 1980.
Pull the front seat forward, recline both sides of the split front seat until they were level with the back seat and the whole inside of the car was a bed.
If you call me I'll hear the Blues Brothers...
Next I caught a ride with a gambler's wife She had a brand new lay down Rambler She parked inside of town, layed the Rambler down She said she sure could dig if I'd knew her
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Back in the 70's, a friend and I drove a beat up Javelin from Cleveland to NYC. It was pouring rain and halfway home the wipers stopped working. They would go up when you slid the lever to On, but wouldn't come back down unless you slid the lever to Off.
I was riding shotgun and had to keep turning the wipers on and off with the lever. This went on for hours until the lever came off in my hand. Luckily, they stopped in the up position and when we pulled over we found that if we manually pulled the wipers down, they would go back up by themselves.
We rummaged through the trunk and found a length of wire just long enough reach the wiper from the passenger window. It was pouring and cold and we ended up putting our socks on our hand so it didn't freeze as we operated the wiper with the wire.
By the time we pulled into NYC, we were wet and dirty and had a memory that we still laugh about to this day. That friend turned out to be my best man many years later.
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On Sat, 21 May 2011 18:29:48 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Hey, it was NOT that bad. They either used prestolite or delco - and they were extremely reliable.

.... And that was a heck of a lot better than general motors' use of manifold vacuum only up untill 1957. If it was raining and you were pulling a long uphill grade --- Good Luck!!!!

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On May 21, 10:57 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Actually, when the vacuum assist pump started leaking, the common "fix" was to simply bypass the pump and hook the two hoses together.
As long as you didn't accelerate onto the highway *too* fast, the wipers would just hesitate, but never actually stop. :-)
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On 5/21/2011 7:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The trick was to get the high quality aftermarket resister that was sealed. The resistors I had trouble with were open in the back exposing the resistor elements to the air. The open units would corrode and burn out. I never had a problem with one of the sealed resistors.
TDD
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On Sun, 22 May 2011 00:11:15 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Corosion wasn't the problem - thermal cycling was - and they NEVER made the vehicle quit - as it was the "start" prtion that failed. I had quite a few sealed or "monolithic" resistors fail too - not just the open-backed ones. Not just on my own Mopars - but on a lot of customer's cars. There WERE brands that lasted longer than others - can't remember what the good ones or bad ones were, but I Think Neihoff was one of the good ones, and Blue Streak (standard) one of the poor ones.
The good ones carried the heat away better than the poor ones, and supported the resistor better so they didn't fracture.
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On Sun, 22 May 2011 13:02:46 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I had a '74 Dart (Swinger) with the slant 6. Drove it about 3 years, then my FIL drove it for another 3. Think I bought it in '79. Never had the problem mentioned here. Maybe it had the Neihoff. Rings a bell. Bought a control module once. Unnecessarily. Recall it was only about 20 bucks, which surprised me.
--Vic
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On 5/22/2011 12:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Even a good resistor could be damaged by a ham fisted wrench maniac. I need a helper bar to tighten the bolt that holds this resistor down.
I never had a problem with this resistor:
https://www.napaonline.com/Catalog/CatalogItemDetail.aspx?A μHICR24_0158169229&AnY9001+101975+50020+2020014
http://preview.tinyurl.com/3spypu6
TDD
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On May 22, 1:02 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

re: "...and they NEVER made the vehicle quit"
In my case it was the computer module of my 1980 Mustang. I went through 3 of them in about 2 years and they did indeed make the vehicle quit.
I'd be driving down the highway at 65 MPH and the car would just shut off. I'd be sailing along and suddenly all of the gauges would drop to zero and I'd just be coasting down the highway.
I'd slip her into neutral, start her back up, and continue on down the road.
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On 5/22/2011 5:03 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

My 89 B100 van with a 318 V8 would just quit running. After fiddling around with it for a while it would run again. I thought is was the computer but no, the computer indicated a loss of timing signal and it turned out to be a narrow range thermal intermittent malfunction of the Hall Effect sensor in the distributor. I've seen the same sort of problem with solid state components in communication and control equipment before so I wasn't surprised.
TDD
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On Sun, 22 May 2011 15:03:59 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

TFI unit on the distributor??? Quite common.
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I'd say through the 60's in my neck of the woods. I did know a guy who didn't trust jacks so he used a come-along and a 6" branch on an oak tree as a lift. He'd jack a Cadillac front end up high enough to change oil easily. They don't make bumpers like *that* anymore.
Candy asses might put a chunk of firewood under the bumper as a safety-- and if they were feeling exceptionally nervous, maybe even chock the wheels.
Lucky we were all pretty much invincible--- 'cept for the ones that weren't.
Jim
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re: "I did know a guy who didn't trust jacks so he used a come-along and a 6" branch on an oak tree as a lift."
I once slid a '65 Dodge Coronet into a fire hydrant, bending the door pillar in far enough that it was touching the driver's seat. I was in the Coast Guard at the time, so I took it over to the docks, borrowed a come-along and hooked it up to a 50,000 lb buoy sinker.
I started cranking the come-along and the car started leaning over, so I jammed a big block of wood under the frame. A few more cranks and the pillar straightened right out, making the doors operable again.
Of course, that didn't do anything for the large hole that the hydrant punched into the rear door panel. :-(
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On Sat, 21 May 2011 13:50:57 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Yesh, that's what I sort of thought.

Yeah. In those days I didn't work under the car much and when I did, I parked one or two wheels on the curb. At least the curb doesn't fall over.

I can't beat that story, but when I worked road construction part of the summer, I had a '50 Olds with both an X-frame and a box frame (an [] frame) and it seemed invincible. People parked in the man-made valley where the Interstate was being built. To go to lunch, I could either back up and turn around in a small space or plunce over an 8 foot pile of dirt, like a quarterback jumping over the linebackers from both sides, to make a touchdown.
Of course being the manly man I am, I chose the second. I got a running start and drove up the hill, and in a second or two the car stopped moving. I got out and all four wheels were off the ground, off the dirt pile. I had to go to the guy who drove the cherrypicker and ask him for help.
He did, after lunch. It took him a couple minutes, and because of the great frame, there was no damage to the car.
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I had a '66 Chev Impala...I used ramps (and still do). That was before "spin-on" oil filters. There was a filter "cartridge" inside a heavy gauge steel cylinder with a big MF'n bolt thru it. (No, I don't have the Chev anymore...I have an "old man's" Buick)
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On Sat, 21 May 2011 04:54:26 -0700, Bob Villa wrote:

My Triumphs had those cartridges, too. It was a right PITA to get to the cartridge bolt (this was on their V8s) and forget about getting it to seal well afterwards (not that it really mattered, because they leaked oil from pretty much everywhere, even when new ;-)
I normally used a floor jack and axle stands, but I seem to remember borrowing ramps from a friend to try once - there was too much overhang in front of the front wheels and the car sat too low to the ground for them to really work, though.
cheers
Jules
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mm wrote:

Back when I was a kid I had a Mazda 808. Neat car.
I used the scissor jack to lift up the back end, then proceeded to crawl under the car for some maintenance. Fortunately the tires were still on the car when the jack slipped, and I was laying flat on my back.
The car fell and compressed my chest a few inches before the suspension drove it back up again. I ended up with a few hairline fractures to my ribs, and a lot of damage to the connective tissue between my ribs and sternum, which made breathing extremely painful for a few weeks, but I was otherwise alright.
The thing was that I knew better, and used the jack because "it was just for a minute".
You can bet that I always use jackstands now, no matter what I'm doing (and I use a better jack, too).
Jon
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On 5/21/2011 8:53 AM, Jon Danniken wrote:

Chuckle. That is how you transition from Young and Immortal, to Wise Old Fart- one scary or expensive lesson at a time. Glad you had no permanent damage. I remember changing an engine mount once, and only felt stupid afterward when my brother pointed out to me that if the jack I was juggling the engine on (Back when oil pans were strong, and a piece of plywood underneath was plenty to lift the engine) had leaked down, I could easily have lost a hand. He was right, of course- I should have stared at the setup long enough to figure out how to wedge the engine with the timbers and planks that were sitting right there.
I'm too fat to fit under modern cars, and (for now) have enough cashflow so I don't have to, so it really isn't an issue for me any more. But if I ever do get crazy like that again, I'll buy decent jackstands, along with the floor jack to replace the one from long ago that seems to have grown legs somehow. No idea when or how that happened....
--
aem sends....



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A lot of folks did work under cars supported by those things. A few aren't here anymore.
They were even dangerous for changing tires, especially on the rear (with rear wheel drive cars - nearly all of them then). That is when I learned to:
- jack the car up with lug nuts already loosened, and the spare on the ground between ground and frame, - pull the flat off and quickly swap it with the spare, - install the spare, then pull the flat out from under the car and lower.
That way if the car fell it wouldn't go all the way to the ground and you could still get a jack under the bumper. Otherwise you were pretty well screwed.
I still do that today with the better socket or screw jacks.
RonB
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Dude, where do you live that you get such good TV programming? Or what is the name of the company. I'd buy.
This stuff they got on today sucks bigtime.
Steve
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