Oscillating tools - loud and not that great?

Maybe it's the tool I bought, but whenever I use my new oscillating tool I'm just not impressed with it.
Cutting wood takes too long. Cutting metal (cuting nails) takes much too long versus a Dremel. And it's LOUD.
I bought a Menards-brand Li-Ion cordless model. Is there THAT much of a difference versus the others? I can't find a review that implies cheap oscillating tools are necessarily worse than, say, Rockwells.
I know that cheap power tools aren't as good as expensive power tools. But when I buy Harbor Freight I get about 80% of the effectiveness and ease-of-use.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 10 Jun 2011 09:44:54 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Scholtes

I bought a HF multi-tool when I did some remodeling last year. Basically to cut the door stops near the floor so I could fit thresholds. Worked fine. Also worked well for some sanding in tight spots. It's not loud at all. Anticipate using it for cleaning out tile grout and some more sanding. Otherwise it won't earn back what I paid for it. It's not for cutting nails or cutting wood except in small amounts. You're using the wrong tool.
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 10 Jun 2011 12:25:16 -0500, Vic Smith

Who is "HF"?
--
croy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
croy wrote the following:

Stick around long enough and you will learn the meaning of HF, and even HD. Harbor Freight and Home Depot..
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I was watching This Old House,and the contractor guy used one of those Fein Multimasters for sawing and cutouts,and it looked very useful.I've heard that the variable speed models are better. I wonder if you can use an incandescent lamp dimmer as a speed control for them? I have one for my ancient Dremel model 270 Mototool.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Probably YES
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The triangle shaped pad does the job in corners, and the sanding disks are stiff and have some overhang so they go right into 90 degree edges. Have to say I only sanded some softened varnish and water staining off some Anderson windows. Wood was pretty soft too. Maybe 45 minutes of sanding use. A drum sander on a drill might have done as well except for the corners, Would have been harder to handle than the multi-tool. I'll pick up the multi-tool first for that window job.

Compared to my saw and belt sander for sure.

I'll keep that in mind. (-:
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

...and makes a total mess of the tile in the meantime. The bits don't last long, either. I went through a couple dozen (they're $10 each at the BORG) doing the surround in my last house.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, that's kinda what a "Roto-Zip" is, so yeah.

Is that why you said: "What literally rips through grout, and I mean like a few feet per minute, is a Rotozip with a diamond blade."?
*THAT* is what I was addressing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've seen TV ads for a new Rototool cutoff saw,that uses rotary BLADES,not bits.
the Rotozip is merely a fancy Dremel Mototool,or a small trim router.
WRT the HF oscillating sander/saw,has anyone tried an incandescent lamp dimmer for an external speed control? I use one for my Dremel 270 Mototool.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Yanik wrote the following:

My one Dremel tool is about 30 years old. It was a single speed drill (high). I then bought a Dremel speed controller soon after that for it to drill, grind, or polish at a slower speed. I recently bought a variable speed Dremel, so I don't use the older Dremel so much.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

the lamp dimmer works fairly well as a speed controller for the Dremel. I built it into a double outlet junction box,so the Dremel just plugs in,or I can use it as a soldering iron temp controller. Plus there's a spare 120VAC outlet for other items. Also,replacing a worn lamp dimmer speed control is cheaper than buying a new Dremel part,and a lot easier to install.The newer Dremel we had at work,it's built-in speed control wore out pretty quickly(got flaky,intermittent),as some of the other techs were tool abusers.
My Dremel is also more than 30 years old,also single speed. Since I have the external speed control,I saw no need to buy a newer Dremel,as the 270 is still working great. I've heard the newer Dremels are not of as good quality.
the only thing I miss from the newer Dremel was the adjustable chuck. (now an option on the latest versions)
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is "dimming" a multi-tool really useful? I've always used mine (a Dremel and a Bosch) flat out. For that matter, I've always used the moto-tool flat out too. ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

for some bits and some materials,using a slower speed on the Dremel is better,less burning or melting and less chatter. just like routers with variable speed are preferable.
I've never used a multi-tool or oscillating sander/cutter.
HF does charge a lot more for their variable speed multi-tool. Besides,a variable speed control is one more thing to break or get flaky.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The reason for variable speed routers is big bits. Turning a panel-raising bit at 25000 RPM gets exciting. ;-)

Again, I don't see the point. Every tool, like these, I have is always cranked to the max.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

ONE reason,not the sole reason. even the woodworker mags mention slowing for different woods,to prevent burning.

I hear ya!

try using a Dremel on plastic;it will melt instead of cut. same for a router or saw.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have the Dremel model and would hate to be without it. I dont cut off nails with it if I cuold use my sawsall or drive them in or pull them out with a hammer.The saw is what it is and doesnt replace my jamb saw, pipe cutter or any other tool. It is a handy little tool though that often fills niches that these other tools don't....this usally means solving access problems.
Jimmie
Jimmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bryan Scholtes wrote:

It has it uses. And for those uses, it is superior.
I've found it superior on:
* Undercutting door-jambs (as one poster mentioned). Beats everything else I tried: Dremel, angle grinder, angled hand saw, etc. * Cutting holes in sheetrock for electrical outlets. * Sanding in tight places. * Mixing oil and water (miscibles).
And today (Friday 6/20) and all weekend, HF has them on sale for $19.99.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am pretty happy with my HF Multi-tool. The thing you should remember is they are not capable of cutting like a full-up circular saw. They might not be quite as effective as a vigorous hand scraping for tiles, etc. A good power sander can possible out-sand them. But they are hard to beat in tight or awkward areas where you need to do that kind of work. It is often hard to get a hack saw into some areas to cut off a nail.
I built a garden building last year and ended up needing to cut an inch or less off of several 2x4 ends near my soffits. I stood and scratched thinking about how hard it was going to be to get a hand saw or saws-all into the close quarters when I remember the multi-tool. It took a couple side entries for each 2x4 but the cut-offs were sitting on the ground in less than one minute for each.
Mine spends a lot of time on the shelf, but when I need it, I love it.
RonB
RonB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.