No power in one bedroom only

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Thanks again all. I did go out and buy a two-part circuit tracker and am now in the process of mapping all of the circuits in the house. Once I'm done doing that, I can turn off the ones that I think might be going to the affected room, and pull down the overhead light. I'm really thinking that I'm going to find the problem there...loose wire or something to that effect. If not, then it's definitately time for a pro (at least I'll have the house mapped!). Since it's starting to get late today, and back to work tomorrow, I probably won't get much more done until next weekend (luckily the problem is in a room that isn't being used right now!). So, I'll post what I find next weekend. I really appreciate all the help and words of advice...it helped point me in the right direction. Hope everyone has a Happy New Year!
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By the way, in case this hasn't occurred to you by now, wire nuts are one of the worst methods ever invented for putting two wires together. If that's where you eventually find the problem, and there's enough wire to work with (in terms of length), consider using crimp connectors. They are legal/within code in some municipalities, and who cares, anyway? Since it's nearly impossible to separate a *PROPERLY DONE* crimp connection, anyplace which prohibits it in the code is a backward town run by knuckle-dragging neanderthals and you should ignore the code.
If it sounds interesting, pick up some crimps and a good tool at HD, Lowes, whatever, along with some wire that matches the gauge you'll be working with, and practice with that wire. The key is to make sure that *all* bare wire is completely within the metal sleeve, with none showing through the transparent plastic ends.
Crimps are NOT appropriate in places where the previous wizard has cut wires too short. To remove crimps, you have to cut the wires, so each time it happens, they get shorter and shorter. If you're sure that one or two cuts will still leave enough to work with, then use crimps.
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Wing nuts are just as good as the crimp method, the secret is getting the insulation off the wires. A wire stripper that pulls the insulation off in one clip without nicking the wire is the best. If the bare wire is nicked then crimping or wing nutting might very well break the wire. The absolute best method is not used very often and that would be to remove the insulation without nicking the wire and then soldering the connection and then insulating it. I must admit I 've never seen one of these break apart !
J
Doug Kanter wrote:

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If wire nuts were as good as crimps, they'd be used in cars, boats and the space station.

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OK Doug, you win, I've never seen wing nuts used on these either. I frequently do wiring on airplane avionics and very used to running wire with no splices and crimp ring terminals. Still it sometimes happens that a wire will break somewhere. I know we don't use them in house wiring but stranded wiring works best in cars, planes, etc. My mention of soldering was mainly directed at stranded wiring...so house wiring, crimp it shall be !!!
J
Doug Kanter wrote:

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Soldered wires sometimes have sharp edges that will punch right through heat shrink tubing. That leads some slobs to resort to trying to add further protection using electrical tape, another abomination.
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I agree with RBM. I had this happen once and was at a loss as to where the problem was. The breakers were all OK but a hallway running past several bedrooms had lost power, outlets as well as light fixtures. After a bit of thought, I decided that there had to be a break in a string of lights and receptacles. I started removing the closest receptacles that had power and sure enough I found one of the chained receptacles where the hot wire had obviously gotten hot and discolored the insulation. The person who had wired the receptacle had elected to use the "push in" connections on the back of the receptacle, rather than using a loop under the screws. The connection with the push in had probably not been a good connection in the first place and, when under power, exhibited enough resistance that it created heat and eventually burned the connections inside the receptacle off to the point that the rest of the circuit downstream lost power.
I've never been fond of the "push in" connections because when you push a wire in you can tell that it's often not really tight and the wire can be twisted around with ease inside the receptacle. This same thing can happen with a wire under a screw, but it's not likely if the loop is formed correctly and the screw tightened sufficiently.
Unless this one receptacle had been replaced, it's probable that most of the rest of the house is wired in the same manner.

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On 26 Dec 2005 08:56:53 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

More than likely the the hot wire is loose in the circut breaker . Check that first. If not the case remove the circut breaker and take it with you to home depot or your local electical supplier to get replacement. This should solve your problem. I fnot then call a well qualified electician. It may cost more now, but in the long run you will be more satisfied. Hope this helped! Anthony snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
................................................................ Posted via TITANnews - Uncensored Newsgroups Access >>>> at http://www.TitanNews.com <<<< -=Every Newsgroup - Anonymous, UNCENSORED, BROADBAND Downloads=-
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It would be rare for any house built in '72 to have a bedroom on a dedicated circuit, so a loose wire at the breaker would not be likely Before replacing a circuit breaker, a simple volt meter or pig tail light can determine if it is working or not

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On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 08:14:49 -0500, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

This is also a case where you would benefit from having determined what was on what circuit, before the failure.

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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Are the light fixtures & all the wall sockets dead?
I'd suspect a broken connection in a junction box somewhere in the house. See if you can physically trace the wiring back to the circuit breaker panel.
Hopefully the suspect junction box isn't behind a finished wall or ceiling.
Handi
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

hmm, wonder what that could be
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