No-alci fuel for small engines

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On Tue, 19 Apr 2011 12:01:35 -0700 (PDT), ransley

AvGas is a sealed can is still AvGas after 5 years. Regular gasoline in a sealed can would be reasonable too, but I wouldn't bet on gasahol.
There is also "TANK STETCHER" you can buy in a sealed can, that you pour into your tank when you run out of gasoline to get you off the highway and hopefully to a gas station. It has something like a 5 year shelf life - but you need to use it while the engine is still warm - you could have problems restarting a cold engine because it's vapour pressure and volatility is quite low.
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On Apr 19, 7:39 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

5 years with Zero change in chemistry? Not in plastic as chemicals in gas permeate plastic, in metal but there is the risk of the seal.
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Hell Toupee wrote:

If it don't frig up your car or truck or motorcycle why should it frig up your lawn mower or leaf blower? I've had no trouble. I don't drain nothing, starts every year just fine.
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Because it can evarporate in the carb leaving behind a varnish coating, in your car you drive it, and fuel injection is sealed.
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LSMFT wrote:

As the article said, automobiles do not use plastic or rubber parts sensitive to alcohol and are equipped with computers that drive the fuel injectors.
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If your doctor IS taking new patients, maybe the old ones are dead?
Mark
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wrote:

NOT TRUE. Just because you have E10 does not mean you WILL have problems - in a very dry atmosphere you can often get away with it - and plastic tanks are less likely to get condensation than metal tanks - ditto for full vs half empty., and non-vented tanks (like on my chain-saw).
However, when ethanol fuel is combined with high humidity and extreme temp changes, water DOES get absorbed by the ethanol, and itf that moisture level gets high enough, and then the temperature drops, for instance, you WILL get phase separation, where the alky and water drop out of the fuel mix - and at higher power settingsparicularly on 2 stroke engines, the engine goes lean (and loses lubrication as well) when that slug of watered down hooch hits theengine - and engine damage occurs.
That is ONE documented problem with hooch-gas.
The SECOND problem is when that watered down hooch sits in the carb and corodes all the copper-containing parts. That's anything brass, as well as a lot of alloy parts. Known as the "greenies", this corrosion product plugs up jets and generally just fouls up everything it gets close too.
The THIRD problem is the hooch is an oxidizer. That's why it is added to the fuel - to make the fuel burn "cleaner" But over time, the oxidizer oxidizes the fuel without burning it - forming a "varnish" that also changes the calibration of the carb by half plugging the jets, and makes float valves stick, damage diphragms in diaphragm carbs and pulse pumps.
That's only THREE reasons Hooch-Gas is not good for (particularly) small engines.
There are others, but these are the main 3 - and NONE of them are "old wives tales" or "Urban Legends", OR inconsequential.
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On Apr 19, 8:04 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I agree. First, Popular Mechanics does a pretty good job vetting urban legends from fact. Second, there have been plenty of other stories done, with interviews of guys who own repair shops, that have reported similar findings.
Does it mean that every small engine will have problems or behave the same? No. Personally, I've had mixed results. My lawn mower, leaf blower, edger, and chain saw have been fine. However, my Tecumseh snowblower carb, for some reason, gets fouled up within a couple months max. I've had it be fine at the start of the winter when tested, then fail to start because of the carb a month and a half later. And that is with gas stabilizer added. Yet that same gas can be used in the other engines, left in them for 3X as long, with no problems.
So, I'd say it depends. And I'd tend to believe repair shops, who have far more experience with this than we do.
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On Apr 19, 7:04 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Gee 25 years using ethanol and I have no complaints, I just dont keep it more than 4-6 months in humid temps. Alcohol is a solvent that reduces varnishing, I dont buy your oxidation theory- urban legand crap. You are not going to get seperation if you use the gas instead of letting it sit a few years, more urban legend crap. Water got absorbed in regular gas to, or did you forget "water on the bottom of the tank' it happens from condensation forming from changes in the weather, google it. Alcohol does alow it to be burnt off instead of sitting in the tank, a true benefit. So you posted 3 versions for excuses of "its bad gas" vs " I was an idiot to keep it for several years and why isnt it good anymore, it must be the alcohol. Bottom line, use your gas in a few months, gas by itself goes stale, even without alcohol, or the effects weather can have to increase moisture content. And your alternative to ethanol, you dont have one unless you waste your time.
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On Wed, 20 Apr 2011 05:21:48 -0700 (PDT), ransley

to keep fuel. Water is not "absorbed" in straight gas. Yes, you got water in the tank, but it was separated from the gasoline. It DOES cause problems, whether you have experienced it or believe it, or not. As a mechanic I see it happen.
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On Apr 20, 5:06 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

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On 4/20/2011 5:06 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

With all this yapping about alcohol in fuel, I had a thought, what the heck are they doing in Brazil where many internal combustion engines are run on straight alcohol? What problems have they overcome over the years when their flex-fuel vehicles run E100 and E20 to E25 blends? o_O
TDD
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On Fri, 22 Apr 2011 08:52:15 -0500, The Daring Dufas

ethanol as a fuel - and the high ethanol blends (basically just heavily "denatured" ethanol) behaves much differently than, say E10 or E15. With 80% ethanol, and particularly in a warm climate, phase separation is not much of a problem.
Their injectors are stainless steel, all fuel system components are designed to be highly corrosion resistant and ethanol resistant. They use different "O" rings and seal materials, and different fuel lines to withstand the chemical environment (teflon lined hoses come to mind)
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