Nighthawk CO detector/alaram

Page 1 of 2  
Anyone knows the difference between the following?
http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid957536000&tab=specs#tablink http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US/diy_main/pg_diy.jsp?CNTTYPE=PROD_META&CNTKEY=misc%2fsearchResults.jsp&BV_SessionID=@@@@0170246150.1067813577@@@@&BV_EngineIDccadcjkkjimdlcgelceffdfgidgmn.0&MID76
The first costs $45. The latter costs $60. Any idea what could justify the 33% price difference?
Thx, Sam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Only the Sears search came up for me, I have that nighthawk , It is a good unit
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

3577@@@@&BV_EngineIDccadcjkkjimdlcgelceffdfgidgmn.0&MID76
The second one that Homedepot carries also detects explosive gases where the one from sears only does CO.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, they don't look the same. Mine looks like the Sears model, sounds like the description but also shows the maximum level as described in the HD ad. However I bought mine at Costco but packaged with an included smoke alarm for $34 last year (Walmart had the same model CO meter for about $42). I wouldn't buy the higher priced one.
I wouldn't have bought this one except that my wife insisted as she is afraid of natural gas. I'll piss someone off about safety, but here goes. Assuming you have a brain and pay attention to how your appliance sound when burning, the chance of CO build up and killing you is about 1/10 that of slipping on a banana peel and being killed by a New York taxi if you never leave Salt Lake City.
Silence Seeker wrote:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid957536000&tab=specs#tablink
http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US/diy_main/pg_diy.jsp?CNTTYPE=PROD_META&CNTKEY=misc%2fsearchResults.jsp&BV_SessionID=@@@@0170246150.1067813577@@@@&BV_EngineIDccadcjkkjimdlcgelceffdfgidgmn.0&MID76
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 00:58:56 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

I noticed one winter day some years ago before CO detectors were common, much less required, that the basement of our house seemed quite humid and damp, so I looked all over it to see if I could find any water leaking or pooling, broken pipes, etc. But no luck.
A few weeks later, after I had stopped thinking about humidity in the basement and during a particularly cold spell, the windows on the first floor steamed up and frost formed on some of them, despite storm windows. This had never happened before. I turned down our humidifier, but the steam on the windows persisted. Soon the weather warmed up a little and the moisture went away. This continued on and off for much of the winter. Every time I would start to think about what might be wrong, the weather would get warmer and the moisture problem would stop.
One morning the furnace didn't come on. We have hot water heat with a gas-fired boiler. I brushed off the gas jets, twirled the impellor -- just fiddled with it really. It came back on and ran properly all day and into the night. Next morning it was off again. Again I fiddled with it cluelessly and again it came on. This pattern repeated itself every few days for a week or two, until I tired of the fiddling and called a repairman. He came and checked out the system, and replaced one of the electrical controls. He adjusted the automatic damper to make sure it wasn't hanging up on the flue pipe that goes into the chimney. Afterwards the furnace ran well for a week or so, then again didn't come on.
I called up the repair place and they sent out another person -- a different guy. He came while I was at work. My wife called me and reported that he removed the vent pipe and looked into the chimney to discover that large pieces of the chimney liner had broken off and fallen down the chimney, partly blocking the flue.
That's when I suddenly realized that the water vapor I'd been noticing was the product of partly burned gases backing up into the house, and that the mild headaches I had been experiencing, and the difficulty waking up in the mornings all winter, and the reason the cats were oddly torpid and sluggish all the time could only be carbon monoxide.
The backup was not quite enough to trigger the safety shutoff on the boiler, except on a few random mornings. Because the furnace is in the basement and I am generally on the second floor of the house, I rarely heard the furnace coming on or shutting off. And in any event, because it is on a thermostat, there was no reason to listen to it, or even to pay much attention to it. And what would that have told me anyway? Mostly it came on when it was supposed to come on. When it didn't come on, I was asleep. But every time it came on, and vented into the chimney, it was also backing up into the house. If the safety device had not shut down the boiler, we might never have discovered the problem.
It was relatively easy for the repair crew to fix it, although not exactly cheap. I also had to call a chimney service company to replace the missing liner -- about a wheelbarrow full of debris was in the bottom of the chimney. We apparently suffered no brain damage, although as I get older, some days that is hard to tell.
I feel that the only reason my wife and I didn't die from this experience is that the house is so old (it's 82 years old) and drafty that enough fresh air seeps in to keep you alive no matter what. And that safety mechanism on the boiler that measures the backdraft.
All in all, I figure that we had a very narrow escape.
And that's why I now have a CO detector.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George your banana peel taxi scenario gives Co poisioning a Zero chance in you book , if you look.. Truth is 160 people die every year from Co from water heaters and furnaces , and Thousands more are made ill.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mark Ransley wrote:

Well not quite, some guy might be driving a New York taxi in Salt Lake City. OTOH, my understanding is that most people killed by CO from using charcoal braziers inside an enclosed building and other stupidities. Truth is, that if the chance of being killed by CO is 160/200,000,000, that is much too worry about, since it is much smaller than the chance of being killed in an auto accident, or by just about any other source including, drowning, shootings, falls in the bathroom, etc. Actually, the chance of dying by all types of accidents is pretty low. Most of us will die of heart disease.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The real point is people die and thousands get sick , needlessly, all for a 50 dollar alarm .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mark Ransley wrote:

If only 160 die per year, it is unlikely that thousands get sick each year. On the same point 100's die each year for lack of buckling seat belts that are already there. Houses burn down and people die because they're too stupid or too cheap to replace batteries in smoke alarms. What I'm saying is that CO in the home is a tiny problem in the scheme of things that will not be appreciably solved by people buying CO detectors. If you want a more pressing problem try addressing the thousands of child deaths because their parents store bad stuff within the childs reach. Now if you can get them to turn their brains on you would save 2-3000 each year instead of 160 people. The name of the game is Priorities.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (mark Ransley) wrote in message

You are absolutely right. After you recommended the SEARS unit, I rushed to the local store and bought one. It costs only $45.
The unit is impressive - it can be installed 3 ways: directly to the 110V outlet, through a detachable power adapter or standing on any surface. It has a battery backup and - most importantly - a PPM counter.
However, the most impressive item in the package was not the detector, but the owner's manual. It has a lot of important and useful information. Enough to make George E. Cawthon's postings look silly.
But I believe he is just pulling everybody's legs here. And some people buy it - to the extent of getting mad and calling names. No need for that. Really.
Thank you everyone for your advice! Sam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Its unfortunate but guys like George Cawthorn exist. They are right , and that is it . no discussion...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Silence Seeker wrote:

Well, I'm fairly serious. After a quick google search on CO, I didn't turn up much more than I had a year ago; there is a lot of conflicting information, so it is best to rely only on government sites. Still, the number of deaths attributable to CO apparently varies widely by reporter and from year to year. Then, there is the problem of how many deaths are attributable to autos, how many to home appliances, how many are industrial, how many are due to camping equipment, and how many are inflicted intentionally. The statistics, at least on the net, are rather fuzzy, so it is really just a guess how many lives could be saved if everyone had an operating CO detector in their house.
More important for most people is chronic poisoning for which the statistics are even more variable, and current CO detectors may not be so good in preventing chronic poisoning for a number of reason.
I too was impressed with my NightHawk, but it hasn't done a thing since I bought it. Maybe that's because my furnace and water heater are only 2 years old and still operating at near their peak efficiency.
My post however was intended to inject a bit of reality into the excessive euphoria of what a CO detector can do. Sorry if I stepped on some persons crank, but not real sorry based on the potty mouth remarks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mark Ransley wrote:

Get the one with the snooze alarm.
--
Ron Hardin
snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You didn't need a CO detector. Headaches? Sluggish? lots of moisture? Seems like you just wanted to ignore the fact that something wasn't right.
Tom Miller wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 22:15:00 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

I think if you were to read my tale a little more carefully you would see that I did what any ordinary person would have done, and perhaps more. I looked for possible causes, but with no reason to connect the symptoms to a hidden furnace problem, or CO, or unburned hydrocarbons, I wrote them off to other reasons. And none of the problems were quite bad enough to be that alarming. I was sometimes sluggish, but who isn't? The cats sleep a lot anyway and are getting older. I had some uncharacteristic headaches but only from time to time -- could be anything. I had trouble waking up sometimes, but doesn't everyone?
Furthermore, the furnace repairman, who is supposed to be trained to diagnose these problems, was as clueless as I was as to the cause. Only when all other possibilities were eliminated did the furnace people check the chimney.
Seems like you just want to ignore the fact that CO is generally an insidious problem that even us smart guys can't always figure out.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom Miller wrote:

You're probably right, but many ordinary get "burned" because they don't call a professional at the first hint of problems. It's unlikely that the bad chimney happened all of a sudden.
I looked for possible causes, but with no reason to connect the

No, everybody doesn't. And they especially don't have all off those things start happening, especially the uncharacteristic headaches. Any time someone start getting bad headaches and/or flu like symptoms and their is combustion close (house or car) one should suspect CO poisoning. That's just a rule, not taught very well though. You had bad luck (or maybe good luck) with changeable weather, but you did suspect something was wrong.

Unfortunately, some professionals don't know much. The first furnace repairman was a dunce, he should have left you with a CO meter, but he apparently was too incompetent do even that.

Your first clue which you ignored was that there wasn't any leaking water but you had high humidity which had to come from some place. The next largest source to a leak would be furnace combustion. CO problems are not common in maintained house appliances. Natural gas is pretty safe, especially with newer appliances. I'm don't mean to jump on you because you missed the correct analysis, since most people probably would. I just objected to the characterization that this was common or a commonly missed problem. Most people that die of CO poisoning do so because they did something stupid or somebody in thier group did something stupid.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 04 Nov 2003 02:38:00 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

It failed and it was a random event. I've had it inspected regularly.
And I did call a professional when the furnace failed. I called the repair service from the gas/electric utility company, PSE&G of New Jersey. But there was no issue about CO -- they were there to fix the furnace.
That's the whole deal with CO poisoning and why a detector is such a good idea. There's an article in the Science section of this morning's NY Times about a doctor who treated two patients with CO poisoning from similar causes. Almost identical to mine, in fact.

This is just silly. First you say that CO poisoning is so rare that it isn't worth getting a detector. Then you say that everyone should know the symptoms of this rare malady and suspect it. Your argument is circular.
Then you argue that I should have figured out what was wrong and the repairman should have figured out what was wrong. Well, duh. I guess if that had happened there wouldn't have been a problem, now would there?
Then you say that most people would not have figured it out, but they should have.
I think you don't know what you think, except you need to justify your original statement. Really, you are just being pigheaded. and trollish. Thank goodness your wife is smarter than you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well George you dont piss me off its your life. It just shows how little you know, probably about most things to. So you can "HEAR" a cracked exchanger, a blocked chimney or leaking flu pipe , Bullshit you can. In just Chgo apx 10 people die a year from Co, thats why in Chgo, All apt bldgs by law must have them . Animals get in chimneys and die, chimneys deteriorate, debris fall and block flue and chimneys . Flue pieces loosen and separate. Furnaces exchangers crack. Alot of people have leaks but are ignorant like you and to stupid to get Co detectors.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mark Ransley wrote:

Well I was a little narrow by saying hearing. Not only should you use your hearing but your other senses to detect if something is wrong with not only your gas appliances but your electricity, water, sewer etc.
OTOH, your deductive power of my knowledge from a simple statement rates an "F" and you apparently can't read, since I wrote that I have a CO detector. Based on the statistic of 160 deaths per year the chance of dying from CO is less than 1 in a 1,000,000 per year. I imagine that are exposed to all sorts of stuff without thinking about it that results in a much higher chance of death. Even though the death rate from car accidents is over 35,000 per year (200 times greater than dying from CO), do you limit the number of miles you drive. Do you smoke? Drink alcohol? Eat too much? Sleep too little? Swim? Ride a bicycle? and just about anything else that can kill you? If you answer yes to any of these then buying a CO detector is unlikely to prolong your life.
No, it isn't that I don't know a lot, it's that you know nothing about risks or risk assessment.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.