New dishwasher connections

Hello to all!
My wife and I just purchased a new dishwasher. After I installed it and ran it for the first time, there was a fairly significant water leak where the drain hose connects to the dishwasher drain port. I used the old black rubber hose that was in place for the old dishwasher. Maybe that was mistake number one. The new dishwasher came with its own white, plastic, corrugated drain pipe--which I am planning on installing this time in an attempt to correct the water leak. Should I put some sort of pipe sealant around this connection, or just try it again without any pipe sealant? Are there any stipulations on how the drain pipe should be positioned? I realize that there shouldn't be any kinks in the drain pipe.
Also, have any of you guys ever experienced any minor leaks where the 90 degree elbow fitting screws into the bottom of the dishwasher? If so, did you ultimately have to use pipe sealant to stop the leak 100%? I tightened the fitting really well, and had wrapped the fitting's threads three times with 1/2" wide teflon tape before screwing it into the bottom of the dishwasher.
Thanks in advance for any tips on eliminating these two leaks! Man I hate chasing down water leaks of any type!!! :-)
J. Perry
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ran
I did that job myself, and it was just a metal clamp that kept the drain hose connected to the garbage disposal. I guess if you don't have a disposal, that makes a difference.
Don't think I've ever used "pipe sealant" that your talking about, but if that is some kind of glue, you might end up having to cut it off to replace.
That doesn't sound attractive.
Sorry I wasn't more help.
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All yoou need is the clamp. The hose size is properly sized and should fit watertight with nothing more than a clamp.

Mine goes right from the DW to the disposal. In some circumstances, an air gap is required.

That should be sufficient. Could be a defictive fitting.
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<< wrapped the fitting's threads three times with 1/2" wide teflon tape >>
Congratulations. You've now proved what every pro plumber knows: Teflon tape is not a sealant; it is a lubricant. HTH
Joe
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tape is

Thanks to all of you guys for the helpful information. After doing some research yesterday, I indeed found out what Joe is alluding to above. Teflon tape is DEFINITELY a lubricant and not a sealant. And of course my leak experience had already demonstrated that, again, just like Joe said. I probably should have contacted a plumber up front before installing it with the teflon tape. Ahhhh..... The price of an education. ;-)
Once again guys, thanks for taking the time to respond with very helpful information!
J. Perry
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snipped-for-privacy@snet.net says...

Just installed a new dishwasher this weekend whose connection threads were quite rough. The first time I hooked it up, it leaked profusely despite being quite snug -- pulled the 90 out and looked in the hole and it had simply bottomed out against a burr, it wasn't really properly tight. After chasing the threads with a tap it went together easily and didn't leak a drop.
--
snipped-for-privacy@phred.org is Joshua Putnam
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Hi 'J',
If I may add my $.02: I always use the plastic drain hoses that ship with the machines. I was hesitant to do this when they first started using the stuff, but it's proven very reliable, and pretty much kink-proof, which can't be said for rubber hoses.
You want to be sure to form a high loop in the drain hose before drooping back down to the drain's branch tee or disposal fitting. I usually just cable-tie the hose to one of the sink clamps, as high as possible up under the countertop. Our local code doesn't require an air gap.
No sealant's required on the drain connection, but without a high loop (or air gap if your code requires one), you risk sink greywater getting into the DW - and that's not pretty!
On the inlet threads, I always uses teflon tape, then brush on some pipe thread sealer over it. Never had one leak in the many years I've done them that way.
Hope that's of some help.
God bless,
Dave Harnish Dave's Repair Service New Albany, PA www.DavesRepair.com snipped-for-privacy@sosbbs.com 570-363-2404
Free home appliance tips from a 32-year pro repair technician! Get your monthly email newsletter here: (Back issues now posted too!) www.DavesRepair.com
John 3:3

ran
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I DID!
I had a hell of a time stopping the leak. I suspect that the threads in the valve or the elbow were screwed up but they looked OK. I used the Teflon tap; Teflon filled pipe dope. Still leaked a drop or two.
I finally had enough and used some silicone RTV (clear) on the joint and let it "cure" overnight. No leak!
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