New A/C blowing warm

This new Hi-Efficency Rheem furnace and A/C was supposed to save me from problems like this...... :^(
Came home from work today, and my month-old system was blowing warm. 93+ furnace, 13 SEER A/C, all new hardware, has been working fine, including over the 90-degree-plus weekend just completed. Inside blower runs, no error messages on fancy thermostat, no tripped breakers or open fuses. Outside box does NOT spin, and no temp difference in the 2 lines leading from inside to outside. Compressor lockup? Coolant leak? Something obvious I am missing?
Yes, I will be calling vendor in the A.M., assuming I don't sweat to death overnight, or the night monsters don't carry me off through the open windows tonight.
Sigh. Ain't nothing easy....
aem sends...
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I don't think a compressor failure or refrigerant leak will stop the condensor fan (outside unit) from running although I suppose there could be some with fancy electronics that tell it to shut down. So two likely possibilities: No power to the condensing unit (despite your checks). Or the thermostat isn't telling it to turn on whether due to a problem with the 'stat or settings or the control wiring to the condensing unit.
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Steve Kraus writes:

Plain old unfancy units have pressure switches that shut the unit down from overpressure on the discharge side, underpressure on the suction side, and/or overtemperature.
Look for a reset button on your compressor.
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Richard J Kinchwrote:

Shut down the whole unit? Good to know. Thought only the compressor would shut off.
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Steve Kraus wrote:

Most 'unfancy' units don't have high pressure / low pressure switches, but instead rely on the compressor overtemperature switch.
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Travis Jordan writes:

Some do, and the OP was looking for easy things to rule out.
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ameijers wrote:

Tripped breakers aren't always apparent. Even if you're convinced they're not tripped, I would move them to the "off" position and then back on.
Beyond that, you should probably leave it until the a.m. so your vendor has no excuse from the warranty.
It might just be a bad contactor or open circuit on the low-voltage side (i.e. a quick fix).
or open fuses. Outside box

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ameijers wrote:

Is that the red (Toyota) coolant or the green (Prestone) brand?
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(snip) Thanks for all the input, guys. I nailed a note to HVAC contractor's door on the way to work, told him where I hid the key. When I got out of the morning meetings, there was a message on my voicemail that they had already been out and fixed it. 'Loose wire', no other details. Nothing obvious to my eyeball exam, so I suspect it was a terminal on one of the control boards inside the pretty metal boxes. I suppose if they didn't snug a screw down, thermal cycling could have made it walk off. Or maybe the mice were doing chinups....
aem sends....
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