Need to make faucet drain pipings fit

Hi,
I'm having some trouble getting the drain out of my new bathroom vanity tops to connect to the old water drain that comes out of the wall. I have the p trap and the piece that connects it to the pipe in the wall lined up, but it appears my new faucet is closer to the wall the the original faucet was.
So what happens is that the pipe that leads out of the p trap and into the wall (making the 90 degree turn) is still in the process of turning when it hits the pipe coming out of the wall. Does that make any bloody sense? It's not easy to describe this stuff with words, sorry.
I need about two more inches of slack to get it to work. Do I need to add some pieces to make it bend away from the wall first, then into a p trap, and then try to head back up and into the wall?
I suppose I could also use one of those flexible pieces (with the ribs) that can bend, but my gut feeling is that those can cause problems in the future, such as clogs and buildup, no?
Thanks for any advice.
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" suppose I could also use one of those flexible pieces (with the ribs) that can bend"
I use car radiator hose. One has been in service in exactly the same situation as you describe since around 1980. Not a hint of problem. Another is a bit newer. Now, the downside is it obviously wasn't done by a plumber, so when you go to sell your house, questions might be raised about the general level of workmanship.
Other than that, I expect these should last forever. ...thehick
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Don't use a ribbed pipe, hair and soap will clog it in no time
The P trap can point in any direction before it rises up before its long trip downhill. Often it will form a loop (spiral) rather than a dip. Does that help, are you trying to keep it all in line.
You may also be able to gain a little space by using 45s and elbows and short sections of pipe to form the P trap rather than trying to make a standard out of the box one fit. Most fittings have a female coupling at both end to mate with a pipe but "street" fittings have a male tail at one end to mate directly with another fitting.
Another kind of P trap is called a "bottle trap" and is more often used on exposed plumbing (so they cost a bit more for a better finish) on pedistal or vessel sinks. They are much more compact and may fit your spot better.
A P-trap is not required to have a cleanout or hand tightened connections but both are advised for bathroom sinks which see the most lost wedding rings etc.
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Thanks guys,
So it is a feasible solution for me to have the p trap pointing to the left (in respect to the wall), come up to a 90 turn pointing at wall, then take another 90 degree turn right (returning to line up with wall drain) and finally another 90 degree turn left into the wall pipe? I'm not sure if that's what you were describing when you mentioned 'spiral' PipeDown.
The bottle trap sounded nice until I saw the prices on Home Depot's website. :)
Thanks.
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If the drain on the sink is directly in line with the stub-out from the wall, then put a 45 degree bend on the stub-out, and a straight length of pipe coming out of that. (all horizontal) Put the P trap on the sink drain and swivel it around until it lines up under the new length of pipe. Then chop off the pipe to fit, and connect with a regular 90 degree bend.
If the stub-out and the drain are not directly in line, then do the same thing, without the 45 degree bend.
See www.goedjn.com/sketch/trap.gif
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