need to build outside bar

I have been asked by the local minor league baseball team to design and provide a materials estimate for a bar to be built at the ballpark. It needs to be about 24 feet long and weatherproof. Nothing too fancy. Just a place for folks to hang out and hoist a few barley sodas. Can anyone provide asistance? I need specs for height of footrail and bar top as well as width of top and what materials to use. Money is a concern for materials. This bar is to be built with volunteer labor. There will be not built ins for this bar. Service will be provided from portable beer coolers. Any info will be appreciated. Thanks
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2008 21:05:36 -0800 (PST), mcred2

I'm sure someone here will provide good dimensions, but to get a feel for them, how about going to an existing bar and measuring what they have. Then put your elbows on the bar, foot on the rail and see how it feels. If you explain what you want to do and maybe buy a drink, I'm sure they won't object. Oh, yeah, measure the stools too. Maybe they don't sell that height at the price you want to pay. (I doubt that, but it's possible and this would be the kind of mistake people don't notice until the bar is built.)

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"mcred2" wrote

Interesting project!
It will have to be very sturdy to last well at all under those conditions. All wood would be PT and all metal, Galvanized. Below for a fairly standard 'walk up and prop your feet, standing bar'. Add stools if desired.
Frame would be either sistered 2x4 or may want to go even to 4x6? For ease, I would sister 2x4 with metal (galvanized) banding straps. To make it pretty 'tip proof' you want a fairly substantial depth but you will need that for the potential kegs anyways. Nominally look at about 3.5ft tall, with a depth of 32 inches. That should be nicely stable. Can go deeper. This will make the height for a keg and it's pump and leave room later to run conduit with electrical at the 'back' of the inside. (beer chiller). Meantime it would hold coolers with ice easily.
Build frame in 8 foot sections then attach (3 sections). Inside each section, make 1 4ft long shelf rack with a depth of 2ft from the top. Things will be stacked there. The bottom shelf under will be handy for plastic cups and whatnot while above it, ice coolers and such can go. The other 4ft inside, make a sturdy bottom (may even want to just use cement cinderblocks or thick paving stones) to support a sizable heavy keg and leave room for the attachment pump.
The reason for the 4ft shelf inside is to add a strongback post to the middle all the way to the top to support it so you wont sag. 2x4 again there. (yes, you will have slightly less than actually 4 ft on each inside 'cabinet' due to the 2x4). Be sure to run 3 of these, back, middle and front, across that 32 inch or so depth.
Once the frame is built, nail 1x6 PT wood (can use house siding wood) to sides and 'front'. For the top, you may want to see if you can get some precut formica type material made for wet outdoor use but failing that, heavy PT plywood such as used in roofing, will work. The supports under will keep sagging to minimal over time.
One small trick. You'll need a level. You want a faint slope to the top so rain runs off. With a 32 inch 'top' you can add as much as 1/4 inch 'thin slat wood' under one end to make that if the ground is dead even (such as on a poured cement base). You didnt mention the footing (slab or bare ground).
I would actually make this with 2 sections together then make a V with the other one so folks can mingle across the bar better, but space to be used may dictate it be one long bar.
Oh foot step height? Gonna vary with the height of the people. 6T by 4D inches is a good one. Easy way is if you can find some railroad ties and just attach them along the front.
Now, last step will be to seal the whole thing. Do this before the top goes on if 'formica' and after if plywood. Find a buddy with a paint sprayer and go to town with a thick plastic-like water sealer in a darker (brown will look nice) color. You want to keep the weather out of the unit for years to come I assume. This step is critical if so. Otherwise, it will fall apart in just 3 ;-) Consider a marine supplies store and the paint used for the hulls and exterior wood of ships.
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