Need quick advice for fixing galvanized horizontal hot water pipe in crawlspace (first time)

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And a large cost to either buy or rent the tool required for the job.
Harry K
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You'll be farther ahead at the end of the day if you just get 50feet of Pex, PVC or even Copper and just replace the whole run to where it is easier to access or has already been replaced.

If you want to waste some time- cut out the obviously bad piece & attach a new on with a couple repair couplings-
http://www.plumbingsupply.com/images/short-galvanized-repair-coupling.jpg
Jim
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On Jan 25, 12:49 am, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

Just get a pipe clamp repair kit and be done in 5 minutes until you think about it, Its a big metal clamp with rubber to surround the pipe, they are standard affair in commercial use and work well, You probably got a leak where the installers pipe wrench dug in far on install so it could be only one bad area. I have about 10 in place at different locations, some are 25+ years old. They are common to put in in buildings where pipes are imbedded, or where replacing is a major major job and shutoffs are a pain, like in big condos office buildings etc, they do work well, Ace has a good brand, I always have spares on hand for different size pipes up to 2-3".
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On Mon, 25 Jan 2010 03:59:11 -0800 (PST), ransley

You beat me to it. That's what I was going to recommend. Brush the crud off and clamp it on. 5 minutes.
Maybe they're right that there will be more leaks, but maybe there won't be, and anyhow, if there are, OP you can put on another clamp or do the replacement work when it's not so cold in the crawlspace.

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My policy on breakers. The first reset, I don't worry about. If it trips again, I go looking.
Maybe the same for pipe leaks? And like the other poster says, time to insulate.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Jan 24, 9:49 pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

in order to utilize a union, you would have to figure out a way to cut out the bad spot and then thread the bare ends. Since you would probably lose a couple inches (or six) of bad pipe, you would need a threaded-both-ends nipple, and a coupler to close the gap. Then you would be able to use a union to join everything back together.
A question worth asking: Is the bad spot due to spot damage? or is the WHOLE length a ticking time bomb?
You may want to get yourself 50 feet of replacement pipe, and since pipe comes generally in 21 foot lengths (from a ~real~ supplier, NOT your usual home centers which sell shorter lengths), you would need to get some couplers and 2-3 individual pieces to make up the length. Make sure one of the pieces is a short-ish threaded both ends nipple and then add the union to cinch everything up nice and tight. Don't forget the pipe dope or teflon tape or whatever would be appropriate to finish the job.
If you've never used teflon tape, be careful to wrap it in such a manner that threading a fitting onto your wrap will NOT accidentally unwrap all your hard work. In other words, no matter if you are right or left handed, wrap clockwise as you face the threaded piece of pipe head on.
Best of luck!
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On Jan 25, 12:49 am, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

http://www.sharkbiteplumbing.com / you could use 2 male adapters and a pipe union. or better yet, a male and a female + a short nipple then a pipe union between. That way you could be a little less accurate & adjust it with the nipple. that still would be a bear tightening the union, if the space is tight. Plan B; use a piece of pex or or something somewhat flexible and 2 Sharkbite joiners. Just be sure to sand the cuts on the old pipe so you don't ruin the seals in the joiners.
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On Mon, 25 Jan 2010 05:20:48 -0800 (PST), Eric in North TX wrote:

Actually, Home Depot solves this problem. It takes two trips.
For trip 1 you buy almost everything you need and then you put it all together, including the 3-piece union and then measure the gap.
In my case, the gap, say it's 25 1/4 inches. You add 1/2 inch to each side so you need a 26 1/4 inch threaded pipe.
Trip 2, back at Home Depot you buy a 10-foot 3/4-inch galvanized pipe and they cut it to 26 1/4 inches and thread it for you on a big oily threading machine in the plumbing aisle.
Theoretically you pop that threaded pipe in and pop on the remaining 2 pieces of the 3-piece union and you're done.
Mine leaked at the 3-piece union so I wasn't done for a long time.
I wonder. How long SHOULD this have taken? For me, all that crawling in the crawl space, shutting off and turning on water, running out to get longer and longer pipe wrenches, multiple trips to Lowes and Home Depot to find that none of them have lead-free dialectric unions, etc., took over 12 hours to fix that one leaky pipe.
How long SHOULD it have taken to fix the leak and what would plumber have charged?
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One uses a union.
http://img.diytrade.com/cdimg/325506/2245945/0/1238153583/Malleable_union_female_conical_joint.jpg
Such as this.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Jan 25, 9:19 am, "Stormin Mormon"

As others have suggested, I'd find convenient points on either end of the run where the bad pipe attaches to existing fittings and convert to copper. Much easier to work with than screwing around with unions, which require pipe to be threaded to exact lengths necessary. With copper, you can also use a repair coupling to avoid having to use a union, A repair coupling is like a regular copper coupling, only it doesn't have bumps inside so you can slide it completely over one piece of pipe, move the adjacent pipe into place next to it, slide it back half way and solder.
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On Mon, 25 Jan 2010 06:53:47 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Does this "repair coupling" work with copper for the long run attached to galvanized on the edges?
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On Jan 25, 10:41 am, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

You use a copper adaptor on each end. The adaptor has male or female threads on one end and a solder fitting on the other. The threaded end connects to wherever you disconnect the galvanized pipe. The repair coupling is only needed if you need to butt one piece of copper pipe up to another to complete the connection, which you may need to do. It depends on how the existing plumbing is connected, your choice of where to disconnect/replace, etc.
The classic example of using a repair coupling would be if you wanted to replace a one foot section of copper pipe in the middle of a run. You cut the one foot out, cut a replacement piece, a repair coupling goes on each end and the coupling gets slid completely onto the new pipe. After it's in place, you slide them back so half the coupling is on the existing pipe, then solder.
If you decide instead to replace with galvanized, you can get galvanized cut and threaded to whatever length you need at HD, Lowes, etc. And with that, as others have said, you would use a galvanized coupling, which gets held in place with essentially a big nut. You could use two couplings, but typically you can screw at least one end of the pipe out of another fitting, so you only need one coupling.
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Elmo wrote:

No, you need to go to a threaded coupling on each end, and use a galv to copper adapter. Threaded one side, looks like a copper fitting on the other. Borg will have it. You then piece in the copper in between, and use the repair coupler for the last inline joint, unless there is enough slop in the line that you can hold the ends apart long enough to slip a regular fitting on.
-- aem sends...
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On Jan 24, 10:49 pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

As you can see from all the replies....there are many different ways to "repair" your situation.
What you choose to do depends on your level of skill, availability of tools and have you decide to balance your time spent vs money spent.
I had a similar situation a bit more than 30 years ago. I heard a "drip, drip, drip" in my crawlspace, my wife was in the hospital having our first kid. I sawzalled out the bad section, threaded the long end of the run, replaced the short end (the leak was very near a fitting) and put in a flexible (copper) water heater connection line.
This "fix" served from Dec 1979 until I PEX'd the house in 2006. The water quality in my area is not conducive to corrosion (many leaks are self-sealing) so I was very lucky that no other leaks appeared and the fix held so long.
YMMV
If you have access to PEX tools, I would suggest a PEX fix. If you're thinking about an eventual copper repipe, do this section with copper and use Shark-Bite.
So as you can see there are lots of ways to do this.
cheers Bob
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How many people have pipe dies just laying around? I sure don't. Wish I did, but those suckers are aspensive.
nate
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Surprisingly cheap at Harbor Freight, and bargains on eBay, too.
Joe
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N8N wrote:

A real supply house will thread long sticks for you pretty cheap, when you buy it. Gotta have your dimensions dialed in rather well to go that route, though.
-- aem sends...
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Yeah...good point. I borrowed my set from a friend's dad in 1979. When I went to return them....he said "keep them, I know you'll get more use out of them than I will". He also gave me the Tri-stand and a 2 1/2" pipe cutter.
I got another set for next to nothing at a garage sale & sold it for $60.
For $60 (or less) on ebay you can get the ratchet handle, a 1/2" & 3/4" dies........way cheaper than new I got my 1" die on ebay.
cheers Bob
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I need friends like yours.
Although I did sell a set of chassis punches years ago that I salvaged from a dumpster. I regret it now, but at the time I was moving every year and that box had to weight 100 lbs.
nate
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Yes ...... it was very generous but the dad was a mechanical engineer (I was an ME student) and my friend was an English major with no interest in tools, etc.
Those punches were a great DD (dumpster dive) but a set weighs a lot and having to lug them around is a real PITA.
cheers Bob
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